• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Dudley Road Hospital -peter Walker

postie

The buck stops here
Staff member
Tby the Poor Law. A patient who is not an inmate of the older institution (the workhouse) must be seen by the workhouse Doctor and formally relegated by him to the Infirmary. The ambulance is then dispatched along the Infirmary Drive and stops under the archway of the receiving house, which stands on the boundary between the grounds of the two establishments.
"Patients ... after medical examination are allocated according to their ailments to the different wards in the main building. Persons suffering from smallpox, scarlet fever and similar complaints are not allowed to pass the receiving house, but are sent to the City Infections Hospital whilst those afflicted with contagious diseases such as erysipelas, ophthalmia and minor infectious diseases such as measles, are transferred at once to wards in a detached building in the Infirmary grounds"
The first Matron (or Lady Superintendent) at the new Infirmary was Anne Gibson who had trained in the Nightingale School. She was supported in post by a number of Nightingale Nurses and Probationers. Whilst working at the workhouse Infirmary Anne Gibson founded the Nurse Training School. She retired in 1912, and died in 1926.
The Central Poor Law Conference held on 13th February 1895 at Guildhall, London, was addressed by Anne Gibson speaking on the subject of Nursing in Workhouses and Workhouse Infirmaries. This was reported in the British Medical Journal.
The first Medical appointment was that of Visiting Surgeon Charles Jordon Lloyd, in addition to Resident Medical Staff. Unfortunately, he died in April 1913 at The Queen's Hospital in Birmingham, whilst working there. The visiting Physicians appointed were Dr. O. J. Kauffman, Dr. T. S. Short and Dr. C. W. Suckling.
The extension of Birmingham in 1911 led to the amalgamation of Birmingham, Aston and Kings Norton Unions into The Birmingham Union.
Dr. F. W. Ellis was appointed Chief Medical Officer to Dudley Road Infirmary and Western House on the 19th March 1913. The employment of Visiting Surgeons and Physicians was then abolished. The Hospital continued to grow from strength to strength, with a strong reputation. Within his first year of office he had analysed and reported in his 'Classification of the Indoor Poor' whereby the acute cases would be taken to Dudley Road Hospital, and the elderly and long term infirm would be taken to Western House. During the First World War, it was used as a Military Hospital, and then later transferred back to the Board of Guardians following the end of War. Frederick Ellis died in May 1939.
In 1925, Miss Olga Snowden was appointed Matron. She did much to improve the facilities and standards at Dudley Road Infirmary, founding the Olga Snowden School of Nursing, before her retirement in 1947.
The National Health Service Act 1946 was implemented in July 1948 with the formation of the Birmingham Regional Health Board. All the Hospitals and Infirmaries were divided into 27 Hospital groups, each group having its own Management Committee. No. 24 (Dudley Road) Hospital Group Management Committee was formed to administer the following Hospitals:
Dudley Road Hospital
Western Road Infirmary
Birmingham and Midland Eye Hospital
St Chad's Hospital
Birmingham and Midland Ear and Throat Hospital
The Skin Hospital
Marston Green Maternity Hospital
Heathfield Road Maternity Hospital
Burcot Grange, Blackwell
Taylor Memorial Home Romsley Hill Hospital
The Front block and Tower of the Hospital was demolished in 1964, and during this time the original foundation stone was lost. A large new out patient department was erected, with support services.

Sources:
Hutton, William: An History of Birmingham, Pearson and Rollason, 1783, reprinted EP Publishing, 1976
Kelly, Wm & Co: Post Office Directory of Birmingham with Staffordshire and Worcestershire, 1849, copied on CD by Midlands Historical Data, 2003
White, William: White's Directory of Birmingham . . . . the Hardware District, 1873, copied on CD by Midlands Historical Data, 2003
Kelly, Wm & Co: Kelly's Directory of Birmingham with its Suburbs and Smethwick, 1943, copied on CD by Midlands Historical Data, 2003
Dent, Robert K: Old and New Birmingham, Houghton & Hammond, 1878 -1880, reprinted EP Publishing, 1973
Gill, Conrad: History of Birmingham, Volume 1 - Manor and Borough to 1865, Oxford University Press, 1952
Briggs, Asa: History of Birmingham, Volume 2 - Borough and City 1865 - 1938, Oxford University Press, 1952
Upton, Chris: A History of Birmingham, Phillimore, 1993
he Hospital started life as the Birmingham Union Infirmary. It was erected in 1889, as an extension to the Workhouse in Western Road, from designs by W. H. Ward architect, and it had a corridor a quarter of a mile long linking nine pavilions, based on a model recommended by Florence Nightingale. It later became known as Dudley Road Infirmary, and then Dudley Road Hospital. It was recently once again renamed City Hospital, Dudley Road.
Extract from Birmingham Daily Post, 22nd April, 1890:
"There is only one way, officially speaking, into the infirmary, and that way lies through the Workhouse Gate, for it is only as an adjunct to the Workhouse that the infirmary is recognised
 

paul stacey

master brummie
I was born in Dudley Road in January 1947, before there was an NHS service, does anyone know how much my parents would have paid for this service, we had to stay rather a long time as the weather was horrendous. Paul
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
hi paul thats a very interesting question...i wonder if anyone knows the answer to how much a hospital confinement would have cost then.

lyn
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
Hi mike
I cannot say just yet what the charges was but i have a case lf the people whom was sent
To the asylum whom would have payed for them around at lodge road there again it would have been part of the western road in those early years
Like the case of Henry Cundy Carter of 67 Lichfield Road Aston
Who has beenremanded twice previously on a charge of attempting suicide,
Was now committed to the asylum.
He jumped off Salford Bridge Gravely Hill on 3rd ,March 1900, but Landed on the foot path
Instead of in the water,
Alan,, Astonian,,,,,
 

Eric Gibson

master brummie
I was born in Dudley Road in January 1947, before there was an NHS service, does anyone know how much my parents would have paid for this service, we had to stay rather a long time as the weather was horrendous. Paul

My parents had four sons, all boys but I think all were born at home so I can't comment on the cost of hospital confinements but I know that they paid into the Birmingham Hospital Saturday Fund at something like 6d a week.
I don't recall them ever talking about the cost of hospital care, I know that my older brother Allen spent a long time in what was then known (to me at least) as Moseley Hall when he was around four years old, 1936ish, with double pneumonia.
 

Old Boy

master brummie
Hi All,
Most working people were members of clubs that did support them if confined to hospital My father, for instance, was a member of the Caledonian Corks who had premises at the top of Golden Hillock Road near Coventry Road. There was also the Royal Antedeluvian Order of Buffaloes who had clubs in many licensed premises.
Old Boy
 

paul stacey

master brummie
Thanks to everyone for your comments,, as Dad was as serving Police officer at this time , I wondered if he would have had some sort of work health insurance. Regards Paul
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
Hi Paul .
I would be very Surprized if he did not have it covered being a Goverment worker
After all there retireing age was 55 I truly Beleived along with prison officiers
When they had the Official HMP prison officiers running these gaols they was aloud at 55
To retire , and on that subject for a briefe mow, because of the goverment as disolved
The HMP prison offiecers and gone private the gaols are being run by prisoners it seems
I dont know these private gaurds have got health care within there work contracts
And they got pensions but by todays valued they aint worth alot to them after all these years
Best wishes paul ,may be one of our members of the exservices of the force may know different
Alan,, Astonian,,,,
 

rogermel

knowlegable brummie
I was born in Dudley Road in January 1947, before there was an NHS service, does anyone know how much my parents would have paid for this service, we had to stay rather a long time as the weather was horrendous. Paul
Thanks Paul, I too was born at Dudley Road and never gave it a thought as to how my mum paid for it. I do know that she had to pay to call in the doctor to me on many occasions because of my chest complaints and I am sure that living down from the gas works could not have helped. How the hard won NHS is taken for granted today.
 

paul stacey

master brummie
How very true, "Rogermel", both my wife and I have real reasons to thank the NHS, the care and treatment she has received over the last 5 years has been outstanding, and she has been given these extra years for us and our family. Thanks Alan as always for your comments. Regards all. Paul
 

Eric Gibson

master brummie
Thanks Paul, I too was born at Dudley Road and never gave it a thought as to how my mum paid for it. I do know that she had to pay to call in the doctor to me on many occasions because of my chest complaints and I am sure that living down from the gas works could not have helped. How the hard won NHS is taken for granted today.

And grossly abused.
 
Top