• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Dollman Street Stores Discussion Here

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
yes viv its a big place but when i was there about 4 years back there were places where items were stored where the public were not allowed
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Bound to be Lyn. This sounds like it started out as a place to store unwanted pieces. That’s good of course, but a proper catalogue (and one that’s accessible to the public) would be helpful. A nice little project for students perhaps ? Viv.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I know it was JOJ 222. Nice 10 minute ride on leather seats upstairs. Roof was a bit low!

What about that stone torch?
I realized Ell, that you would know about the bus and I envy your ride on it. I always liked that particular model. However as it is a side on view, few identifying details - registration number and radiator for example - are there for others to see.
Regarding the torch, it is my suggestion that the plinth could be Dartmoor granite; a stone I am very familiar with. I see a sample of it daily. :D
 
Last edited:

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
What does the torch represent ? Presumably it doesn’t Belong with the massive plinth ? Viv.
 

boomy

master brummie
What does the torch represent ? Presumably it doesn’t Belong with the massive plinth ? Viv.
Personally, I would never visit Dollman Street stores as it not only encourages, but condones the council's decision to dump what little remains of Birmingham's industrial heritage in a rat-infested warehouse, rather than build an industrial heritage centre that Birmingham, the "City of a Thousand Trades" could be proud of.
Millennium Pointless never was, and never will be a decent museum, and in fact, the title Museum of Science & Industry is no longer used as Millennium Pointless in now the Birmingham Events Centre, and of course, the council considers it more important to spend hundreds of millions of pounds on a sports event that nobody else in the world wants to touch with a barge-pole.
Boomy
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
I realized Ell, that you would know about the bus and I envy your ride on it. I always liked that particular model. However as it is a side on view, few identifying details - registration number and radiator for example - are there for others to see.
Here are some more views of it from last week outside and inside!

On Snow Hill Queensway.





Top deck





It left Snow Hill Queensway via Colmore Circus, then onto The Priory Queesnway and up Corporation Street, past the courts.
Then up to Dartmouth Circus and onto Dartmouth Middleway and Lawley Middleway (including passing over the new look Ashted Circus if it's still called that). Then up Vauxhall Road, past Duddeston Station and down Dollman Street. It reversed in!
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
I’m all for an industrial heritage centre. With the right minds applied to it, good financial planning and lots of willing volunteers surely it could be a runner. But if the will’s not there it won’t happen. Additionally if we aren’t persistent it won’t happen either. So the best thing we can do is keep banging on about it and bring pressure to bare.

My question is: how do other places get these ideas into the public eye ?
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Well the interior of that bus is a nice blast from the past. Loved that back seat and the front seats. View from the front as a kid was wonderful, above everything and generally unseen by people below. Looking into windows you couldn’t see at ground level. Views over hedges, spotting all sorts of interesting things. Of course this was on a dry day and with very few smokers aboard. Wet days meant dripping windows and smokey eyes and clothes. The good old days ! Viv.
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
A few more photos from last Sunday that I've just uploaded. Some items I previously took in 2012 and took again last weekend.

Most items seem to be in the same spot as they were previously in the warehouse.



Petrol Pump dated 1932



Cadbury Chocolate Factory model



Topographic Model of the Birmingham Canal Navigation. Used to be at the Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry.

 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
Personally, I would never visit Dollman Street stores as it not only encourages, but condones the council's decision to dump what little remains of Birmingham's industrial heritage in a rat-infested warehouse, rather than build an industrial heritage centre that Birmingham, the "City of a Thousand Trades" could be proud of.
Millennium Pointless never was, and never will be a decent museum, and in fact, the title Museum of Science & Industry is no longer used as Millennium Pointless in now the Birmingham Events Centre, and of course, the council considers it more important to spend hundreds of millions of pounds on a sports event that nobody else in the world wants to touch with a barge-pole.
Boomy

good post boomy could not agree with you more

lyn
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Lyn and Boomy,
I understand your disappointment that the city has not got a purpose built place to display the city's heritage especially compared with the one in Dudley which has become such a well known and well visited attraction. I have been to the Black Country Museum, some years ago, and the great thing about it was that besides those, usually men - but not always ;) - who like looking at industrial and transport items, there is also a lot to interest others, particularly women.
I get the impression that Birmingham is probably more cosmopolitan than the surrounding areas and maybe suffers from the lack of deep seated roots, in some quarters, in the city. Not really a criticism as such, just how I see it.
But that constant influx of people, over the last two cenuturies, is what created the expansion of the city and its industrial base. The loss of the great expansive era of a 'city of 1000 trades', I guess, has weakened some peoples interest in heritage.
However, a great many artefacts, relating to Birmingham's past, appear to be stored in Dollman Street and even if the place is not ideal, they could, so easily, have ended up in a land fill somewhere. So, at least some folk - other than BHF Members :D- do care about the great heritage of the past. :)
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
I too am glad these items are in storage rather than disposed of. I see they loan out items. I expect this is to schools etc. Hopefully they loan out to film/media companies for a fee too, as some antique dealers/architectural salvage companies do. A pity to have all this stuff in storage and never seen.

Ultimately, it would be great to have a heritage centre, but maybe it needs a bit more creative thinking to put it to use in a different way. A nice touch is using the old bus to transport people there. Who knows what might become viable in the future. But for the present at least the items are safely stored - just be helpful to have a catalogue of what exactly is in there. Viv.
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Some busts. Probably only come out on temporary exhibitions or loaned out like you say.

William Shakespeare



Cosimo II de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany



Henry Earl of Pembroke 1750



Frederick Lord Leighton

 

boomy

master brummie
Lyn and Boomy,
I understand your disappointment that the city has not got a purpose built place to display the city's heritage especially compared with the one in Dudley which has become such a well known and well visited attraction. I have been to the Black Country Museum, some years ago, and the great thing about it was that besides those, usually men - but not always ;) - who like looking at industrial and transport items, there is also a lot to interest others, particularly women.
I get the impression that Birmingham is probably more cosmopolitan than the surrounding areas and maybe suffers from the lack of deep seated roots, in some quarters, in the city. Not really a criticism as such, just how I see it.
But that constant influx of people, over the last two cenuturies, is what created the expansion of the city and its industrial base. The loss of the great expansive era of a 'city of 1000 trades', I guess, has weakened some peoples interest in heritage.
However, a great many artefacts, relating to Birmingham's past, appear to be stored in Dollman Street and even if the place is not ideal, they could, so easily, have ended up in a land fill somewhere. So, at least some folk - other than BHF Members :D- do care about the great heritage of the past. :)
Radiorails,
I think its part of the British character to have a good moan, but few of us ever do anything practical about our moans.
I have spent hundreds of hours researching some Birmingham companies and spent lots of time and money locating and acquiring archive material, resulting in me publishing books about Herbert Austin, Wolseley, Morris Commercial and Alldays & Onions.
Unlike many authors (amateur) I have always been prepared not only to put my money where my mouth is and pay to publish my own books, but have always kept to my principle of never accepting royalty payments from their sales.
So, in my own way, I do consider that I have done-my-bit to promote these Birmingham companies and share my research with anyone interested and obviously DO CARE about the great heritage of the past!
Boomy
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Dollman Street is a fantastic place to visit it appears, but preferably in dark clothes. :D It also seems to be a place where more than one visit would be essential - rather like visiting a large town for the first time. It is unlikely that I would get there so I appreciate the photos of some of the artefacts stored there.
It is interesting to note that the first posts in this thread - twelve years ago - were suggesting that a decent kind of exhibition place be found to display many of the items in store.
Looking in, from outside, it seems that the city is quite prompt in removing much of its history - agreed some areas needed to go - but somewhat slack in preserving what is left and providing a suitable place somewhere for all to see what remains. It doesn't have to be in the expensive inner city area; Wythall, Aldridge and I guess some of the other heritage places do well on the perimeter.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Absolutely Alan. And if you get people to think creatively about how that could be made to work, it’s a possible way forward. The Black Country Museum didn’t get off the ground and become a success story by using the traditional museum model. Viv.
 

rockit

LowTech
[QUOTE="... A pity to have all this stuff in storage and never seen.... would be great to have a heritage centre, but maybe it needs a bit more creative thinking to put it to use in a different way. A nice touch is using the old bus to transport people there. Who knows what might become viable in the future.... [/QUOTE]

...or even a metro tram thingy fom town centre if they can get around to making outskirts more accessible...

Attached pic of early 'Desktop' which I think was at Newhall Street museum but now at Warehouse.
 

Attachments

Last edited:
Top