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Devon street

chocks2

master brummie
The stories my Grandad could tell you about Devon Street were he still here. He was the window cleaner down there in the late 40's and early 50's
 

pedlarman

master brummie
The stories my Grandad could tell you about Devon Street were he still here. He was the window cleaner down there in the late 40's and early 50's
Chocks2: I wonder if your grandad ever mentioned the bookie - Harry Jones - who operated (illegaly in those days!) from, I think it was No. 10...

No.10 was my Aunt Lil's house. She was Harry's sister-in-law, being married to Lil's sister, who was also my mother's sister - hence Lil being my aunt.

Telephones were difficult to get in those days (just after the war) and I used to "Pony Express" for Uncle Harry, on a bike, to another bookie further down Devon Street who did have a phone. That's where I picked up Harry's racing results so that he could work out the punter's winnings...

Those were the days !

Cheers,

Jim Pedley (pedlarman)
 

chocks2

master brummie
Chocks2: I wonder if your grandad ever mentioned the bookie - Harry Jones - who operated (illegaly in those days!) from, I think it was No. 10...


Pedlarman. My Grandad was a bookies runner for someone down that way but that would have been in the 30's vwhilst on leave from the army. He was arrested for it but they fined him rather than send him to prison because of his career. For several years after my dad had to take sixpence a week up to the court but he never knew why 'till after the war
 

pedlarman

master brummie
Chocks2: I wonder if your grandad ever mentioned the bookie - Harry Jones - who operated (illegaly in those days!) from, I think it was No. 10...


Pedlarman. My Grandad was a bookies runner for someone down that way but that would have been in the 30's vwhilst on leave from the army. He was arrested for it but they fined him rather than send him to prison because of his career. For several years after my dad had to take sixpence a week up to the court but he never knew why 'till after the war
Chocks2: It was the depressed Thirties when your grandad was arrested, and in any case, I don't suppose that the Army paid its rankers much of a wage. So I presume your dad was paying off your grandad's fine by instalments.

I can't really say whether or not your grandad may have done some occasional "running" for my uncle as I don't know when Uncle Harry started up. I know that in the middle Forties - when Harry was operating - there was at least one other bookie in Devon Street, from whom I used to get the results...

Cheers,

Jim Pedley (pedlarman)
 

Allanj111

proper brummie kid
My grandparents lived in Devon Street in the late 1800's and early 1900's. Their name was Wright and they were a large family, my mother being born in 1913 was the youngest of the children. She lived there until 1930's.
 

maccalenny

master brummie
Devon Street - my grandad was born there in 1918. His parents, Charles and Edith Lee, ran a grocers shop at no 87. They left in 1922, on doctors, orders, for a pollution-free life in worcestershire, as my great-grandfather was asthmatic. I wondered if anyone knows if the shop there continued after they left?

Attached is a page from their receipt/invoice book.

View attachment 45197
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Don't have any directories form period 1922-31 but :
1932 -1937 Dixon Mrs. Emma,-shopkeeper
Emma and Nathan Dixon are listed on the electoral roll in 1925 and 1930, so she almost certainly ran a shop there from 1925-37, and I would think it pretty likely that she took over from your great grandfather.
there are no entries for the shop after 1937 so it probably reverted to being a house.
mike

 

maccalenny

master brummie
Hi all - as a few of you had family from Devon Street, just wondere dif any of you wanted to claim the girl on the left. Her name is Dollie, and the date on the back is 1921. The girl on the right is my great-auntie, who lived at no 87. It says that Dollie was a neighbour. I did have a look through the 1911 census but could not find a Dollie on Devon Street, but there were a couple of Dorothy and Doris, which might be her I guess.

View attachment 45662
 

sylviasayers

master brummie
Mac, seeing the page you posted with Lively Polly illustrated took me back to my early childhood, my mom used it for washing up, it was in a brown packet about the size of the old quarter pound packs of tea. The name always fascinated me.
 

Amanda Prentice

New Member
I am trying to find out more about my family who lived in Devon Street (numbers 9, 14 and 17) until the 1950s. If anyone remembers the Price family (I believe Nellie Price ran a shop during the war) or the Todds, Wiltshire or Prentices, I would love to learn more.
 

irene floyd

master brummie
My friend Margaret Carter lived in Devon Street her parents name were Kath and Chris she has a brother Barry and a sister Carol...St Annes was my junior school.We lived in Inkerman Street
 

Sarah M

Brummie babby
My great grandad (Alfred John Clarke - known as Fred) lived bk of 150 Devon street with his Mum and 2 sisters in1891. Interested in any photos or memories.
 

Saz25

New Member
My great grandad Charles Joseph Smith lived at Court House, 14 Devon Street in 1901. His occupation was given as a shoeing smith, but I've not managed to find out much more about him and his family. I'm also interested in any photos of Devon Street of shoeing smith information or pictures. Thank you.
 

Saz25

New Member
My Great Grandad Charles Joseph Smith lived at Court House, 14, Devon Street in the 1901 census with his wife Elizabeth and 3 children. They had moved thee from Southwold and he was a shoeing smith. Would love to see any pictures of the area from around that time. He didn't live there long as his wife died in 1905, he abandoned his children and returned to Southwold with his new wife where he had a new family!
 
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