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Davenports

ericjoesbury

Brummie babby
Hello Dale, Ada was the 7th Daughter b. 1878 of Joseph Davenport b.1832 d.1910.
She married William Robert Walker Murray , Solicitor.
Her Brother Baron John is my 2nd Cousin 3x removed. Sounds distant but we share the same 4 x Great Grandfather Robert Davenport b.1765.
so you and I are related albeit distant.

I have done a large amount of family research and would love to hear from you.Thank you. Clive D.
Hello Dale, Ada was the 7th Daughter b. 1878 of Joseph Davenport b.1832 d.1910.
She married William Robert Walker Murray , Solicitor.
Her Brother Baron John is my 2nd Cousin 3x removed. Sounds distant but we share the same 4 x Great Grandfather Robert Davenport b.1765.
so you and I are related albeit distant.

I have done a large amount of family research and would love to hear from you.Thank you. Clive D.
I am the secretary for central edgbaston bowls club which Baron John Davenport was a member we have some interesting history of how he and other members supported the troops injured at the Soome 1916 .
 

Dave Ackrill

proper brummie kid
I spent some of my apprenticeship working at the Davenports brewery. The bottling lines were in the main entrance to the old building and the brewing happened behind that in a factory that had been built later.

I can guess why they closed it down as it wasn't a very efficient place to carry out brewing and the bigger lorry's, that were starting to be used in the 1980s, struggled to get in and out of the site at times.
 

ericjoesbury

Brummie babby
John Davenport and his sons had a small malting business at the beginning of the 19th and by 1846 it was growing quite rapidly till in 1897 it became a limited company
It was not until 1901 when Baron John Davenport took active control over the management that rapid changes were made and he was the one that had his eye on the home delivery trade rather than the public house trade and using the slogan Beer at Home he started the home delivery trade
In 1919 to 1936 the Brewery was completely rebuilt and they sunk a bore hole over 700 feet through the earth which took 5 years to sink till the found the purest water they could find to make the beer. A note I should add that the Brewery received two direct hits with 1,000 Ib bombs during WW2 and both failed to go off causing only minor damage
Photo shows the delivery trucks out side the front of the building in Bath Row
I am the secretary of the Central Edgbaston Bowls Club and John Davenport was a member for many years at the time we held fun days for the injured troops every month . when we gave the troops and the nurses a chance to relax for a day with free cakes and drinks plus a small present to leave with. John Davenport was there on 12th July 1916 when we had a day for the injured Troops from the Somme .this is a rare picture of him with the troops [ hes the one with the pipe and bowler ]
 

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DavidGrain

master brummie
I have just come across this thread having made a reference to Davenports on another thread so I am posting this link.

I apologise if this link has been given before as i said I have just come across it. If you go to the link you will find some of the vintage Beer At Home cinema and TV adverts. Also there are a couple of archive films giving the Davenports story.
 
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