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Dads Army. Warwickshire Home Guard

wotsinaname

Brummie Born and Bred
Self explanatory really.This is a photo of "E" company 24th battalion Warwickshire Home Guard Number 4 platoon. My Uncle Jimmy Brown is the Sergeant 2nd right from the sign. I have no Idea of the date of this picture.
 

ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
A great picture, wotsinaname, and thanks for posting it. It's a real shame when gems like this get hidden away or, worse still, lost.

There are experts around who will probably be able to look at the details of the uniform and give you an idea of the date. (Probably not on this forum though. I can give you a link if you ever want to pursue this).

Chris
 

wotsinaname

Brummie Born and Bred
Thanks for your kind words. you are correct about pictures being lost. this one and other family photo's were almost thrown away when my aunt died.
I have visited your web site and what a fascinating place it is. I shall certainly spend some time exploring it.

have fun and be happy:)
 

Alf

Gone but not forgotten. R.I.P.
Welcome Wots long time no post, but worth the wait great photo:)
 

ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
The 24th Warwickshire (Birmingham) Battalion's area of responsibility was, I believe, Moseley. Each Company (obviously five at least) would have had a defined geographical area to look after and that would in turn have been split down further to represent the patch of particular platoons, one of which this picture shows. Note the older men, several wearing Great War ribbons: survivors of the Western Front and elsewhere, taking up arms again little more than 20 years after coming home from the war to end all wars.

The 24th, just one of some 47 in the county and 26 in Birmingham itself, appears to have been a bigger Battalion than most and included more than 70 officers in 1941. This would mean that the unit as a whole would have had a membership of well over 1000 blokes (and, later on, a number of women). The population would have changed a bit as the years went by, with the younger fellows being called up and a few dropping out due to age or ill-health. But many would have served for the entire period, from the middle of 1940 until stand-down in December 1944, a record of remarkable, devoted and entirely voluntary service.

Chris
 

Brettw

Brummie babby
My grandfather was a Sergant in the Home Guard based at Austin Longbridge.
Can anyone help me find more info about him as I have drawn a blank.
Thanks
Brettw
 

ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
Great picture, Brettw!

There's a bit of guidance on searching for individual Home Guards here, if you haven't already seen it.

I'd be happy to provide a mention of your grandfather, and your quest for further information, on the same website, if you would like that. IM me if you want to consider this.

Chris
 

Fentham

master brummie
My father was in the Home Guard and he was stationed at Hams Hall Power Station (he also worked there) Are there any photographs of Warwickshire Home Guarde
 

ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
I have collected a few Warwickshire Home Guard images, Fentham, and this website summary page will lead you to them. Nothing specifically on Ham's Hall, I'm afraid.

(All images were lost from the Forum after a hacking attack a few weeks ago. wotsinaname's excellent image was one of them. If he/she still follows the Forum it would be great if it could be replaced with the help of the Tutorial at the top of the page).

Chris
 
S

Stitcher

Guest
img050~0.jpg

I don'tknow if this a scene from Birmingham but it does illustrate what was going on.
 
S

Stitcher

Guest
img051.jpg

Home Guards marching past Birmingham Council House. The rifles were for show only, ammunition was rarely issued for fear of 'friendly fire' casualties.
 

Pete R

Rocker
My maternal Grandfather & Great-Uncle were in the HG in the Sutton North area. I have a couple of posed Photos if they are any use. Most Home Defence around North Warwks was done by young farm workers.
 

Fentham

master brummie
Hello Rocker,
Your offer is most welcome. I would love to see the photos, if you want my home address I will let you have it or perhaps you can put them on the BHF. The sad thing is I also have a photo, which I cannot find.
It is of the Home Guard all sitting at long tables somewhere and my Dad is on it. It must be safe somewhere, there are many home guard on this photo to someone else somewhere must have a copy.
I wondered if it was in any of the papers. Dad worked at Hams Hall and was also based there for Home Guard duties. In the Birmingham Library there is a Hams Hall diary of the events of the Home Guard
day by day. It makes good reading. We hope to go back there when the Library is up and running and photo the sheets.
Best wishes
 

BassOne

New Member
I have in my possession a document related to the 42nd Warwickshire (Birmingham) Battalion Home Guard. It is a Souvenir 1940-1944 of a Dinner at the Imperial Hotel, 3rd October 1944. It includes details of menu, toasts, entertainment etc. and a photo of the Officers taken at HQ on 17th September 1944. There are 42 autographs at the back. The front is inscribed Lt. E.J Moon. M.C. I will scan it asap and would be willing to pass it on to any interested party.
 

Fentham

master brummie
Hello
The description you have sounds as though the photo I have, but cannot find, may have been taken at the Imperial Hotel. I don't suppose there is a photo of the event. My Dad was obviously not an officer, but there was a lot of people on the photo.
Best wishes
Jean
 

ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
Welcome to the Forum, BassOne, and yes, please, let's see the souvenir programme on this thread!

It would be interesting to know which area of the city the 42nd Warwickshire (Birmingham) Battalion had the responsibility of defending.

It's a little strange - Lt. Moon is not listed as an officer in the 1941 Officer's List. Yet he was a decorated officer, most probably from the Great War, and such men were always the first to be appointed to a position of authority in the earliest days of the Home Guard. For one reason or another he must have been a later joiner.

Chris
 

rosie

brummie
My Dad worked at Belliss & Morcom with submarine engines. I don't know much more except it was called a "reserved occupation" and therefore he served in the Homeguard.

He patrolled the dam at Edgbaston Reservoir as part of the duties. Mum did Firewatch, but I gather most people took a turn................I wish we had talked about this while there was still chance........

rosie.
 
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