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d-day landings

john70

master brummie
Great photo,s, I have been 3 times to most of these locations and found it a very rewarding experience, my dad landed at Juno beach on D Day plus 5 with the 7th armoured brigade.
 

lencops

gone but not forgotten
33 bus, A great site, i was working a machine when news of D Day landings came on the factory speakers, i was 15yrs young at the time, all the workers cheered some had tears in their eyes, a great day in time, RIP to the fallen and hope the wounded recovered to full health. Len.
 

bobsummers

Gone but not forgotten. R.I.P.
I have just returned from a very humbling tour of the beeches of Normandy, France.
I am quite shocked that there are not many posts on this site to this historic event, that has certainly shaped all our lives since in this country was freed from evil forces of Nazism.
I visited Pegasus Bridge, Mervllie Batteries, Point Du hoc, the USA and British cemerteries and all the 5 beaches.
I for one am very thankfull for all the personel that put their lives on the line to give me my free lifestyle.
 
A

archierod

Guest
think I have mentioned before, that the Birmingham Accident Hospital (the Acci) previously the Queens hospital in Bath row took some of the first casualties of the normandy landings - set up in 42' specifically for this purpose.
 

chocks2

master brummie
Sadly another important historical event that the education system fails to inform the youth of today about.

Today
I sat upon that beach in France and watched the children play.
Amongst the gun emplacements, reminders of that day.
They know not what their fathers did upon that bloody shore,
on that day, the Sixth of June in Nineteen Forty Four.

WT1998
 

Big Gee

master brummie
I saw today that an Englishman called Peter Lake, who had helped train the French Resistance in terror tactics, was told by de Gaulle (personally, I think) shortly after D-Day that his presence in France was no longer required and that he must leave immediately.

Vive la France...not.

Big Gee
 

Ray Barrett

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN R.I.P.
Big G,
Perhaps De gaule had the hump,because the allies didn't tell him about the D day landings.It was thought if the French were told,the Germans would know our plans within hours.
With friends like these...who needs enemies?.
 

Graham

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN
We have to be tolerant and forgiving as it is not De Gaulle's fault that he was born French.:D
 

Tailgunner

knowlegable brummie
My Grandad Joe Holtham (Kerwyks Lane Sparkbrook) was a Medic with the RAMC on D-day, landed at Hermanville Sword Beach... bless him I miss him very much and will never forget him nor all his fellow servicemen :)
Cheers Simon.
 

sheldontony

master brummie
Just found this interesting site. I have visited Normandy twice to visit the D-Day beaches. The second time I was stood on one of the British beaches and next to me was an elderly gentleman that had been on the same tour. We both stood in silence taking in the view and atmosphere and I said to him " have you been here before?" meaning as a visit. He said "Yes, the last time there was a large British warship just off this beach firing at the German defences". Gobsmacked wasn't the right expression I felt - humbled was closer. I have just read (twice) an amazing book about the first american spearhead on Omaha - called the Bedford Boys. This is about a small town in Virginia where the local boys joined the National Guard (described in the book as something similar to youth club) and ended up in the first wave similar the the situation of the Pals Battalions. Many lost the lives at the D1 draw at Omaha and I attach a pic of the German gun emplacement that raked the beach there. I also have pics of Pegasus bridge if anyone interested.DSCF0014.jpg
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
Just found this interesting site. I have visited Normandy twice to visit the D-Day beaches. The second time I was stood on one of the British beaches and next to me was an elderly gentleman that had been on the same tour. We both stood in silence taking in the view and atmosphere and I said to him " have you been here before?" meaning as a visit. He said "Yes, the last time there was a large British warship just off this beach firing at the German defences". Gobsmacked wasn't the right expression I felt - humbled was closer. I have just read (twice) an amazing book about the first american spearhead on Omaha - called the Bedford Boys. This is about a small town in Virginia where the local boys joined the National Guard (described in the book as something similar to youth club) and ended up in the first wave similar the the situation of the Pals Battalions. Many lost the lives at the D1 draw at Omaha and I attach a pic of the German gun emplacement that raked the beach there. I also have pics of Pegasus bridge if anyone interested.View attachment 82927

Yes please, I would love to see those
 

sheldontony

master brummie
thanks.DSCF0019.jpg

this is looking along Omaha beach showing the bluffs that had German machine guns and artillery. Although it shows people sat on the beach I was informed that people enjoying the beach is rarely seen. The next pic shows the expanse of beach that had to be crossed at low tide

DSCF0020.jpg
 

hansonbridge

proper brummie kid
The gearboxes used on the landing jetties of the Mulberry Harbours were, I believe, made by the MOSS GEAR Co of Chester Rd, Erdington. My Dad, who worked at the Moss during and after the War told me this.
 
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