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Curzon Street Railway Station

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Curzon Street Station seen at sunset with the Birmingham Big Wheel - here for Ice Skate Birmingham (moved to Eastside this year from Centenary Square).



 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Took this from Birmingham Moor Street Station of Millennium Point as the Royal Visit happened this morning, but also got Curzon Street Station and the future HS2 station site in the shot!

 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Norton think's it's a dangerous website, but am able to continue to the page to open the PDF.

Norton is reporting it as a threat!
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
The internet archive is one of the biggest online depositories of books on the internet. I have never had any trouble with it, and if I did I would start worrying about sites such as the national archives
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
For some reason Norton Anti-Virus scanned it and found it to be unsafe. It even put a red X on the Norton Safe Web.

For instance this site has a green tick meaning it's safe (no issues).
 

horsencart

master brummie

Heartland

master brummie
The claim on the banners outside Curzon Street station buildings make this claim, but was it the first?
Curzon Street opened on April 9th 1838 and was the junction of two main lines, the London & Birmingham Railway and the Grand Junction Railway. Both the London & Birmingham Rly and GJR was built over time. The GJR reached Birmingham first with a station at Vauxhall opened in July 4th, 1837. This second line was extended to a station adjacent to the LBR station during January 1839.

Other passenger railways had opened earlier. The Liverpool and Manchester Railway was opened September 15th, 1830 with passenger termini at Crown Street, Liverpool and Liverpool Road Manchester. Their railway was a main line between cities and had various branches to Bolton, Wigan and Warrington.

London Euston the terminus of the London & Birmingham was opened in 1837, but it was not until the completion of Kilsby Tunnel (June 24th, 1838) that the line between Birmingham and London was complete.

It is difficult to justify the claim, if the Liverpool & Manchester is considered a main line, but from January 1839 Curzon Street was at the heart of the main line that linked London with the North West.
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
It was the first London & Birmingham railway train to arrive on Monday 17th September 1838.

See this plaque at Curzon Street Station (it might be hidden now by the hoardings).



Says it was the first mainline terminus station.

 

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
The first was actually Vauxhall Station it opened in 1837 as a temporary terminus for the Grand Junction Railway from Warrington until Curzon Street opened later. it was then renamed Vauxhall & Duddeston. I believe it is now just called Duddeston Station.
 

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Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
There is a book jointly authored by Paul Leslie Line and others called Wildfire Through Staffordshire (Armchair Time Travellers Railway Atlas) that covers the story of the Grand Junction railway, on the 4th of July 1837 that is quite informitive.

Link Here
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
I thought the claim to be the first main line rather odd when I read it sometime last year.
I have a reprint of the official guide to the Grand Junction Railway published in 1838. It describes Liverpool as 'a seaport in West Derby'. To day West Derby is a suburb of Liverpool
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
The claim on the banners outside Curzon Street station buildings make this claim, but was it the first?
Curzon Street opened on April 9th 1838 and was the junction of two main lines, the London & Birmingham Railway and the Grand Junction Railway. Both the London & Birmingham Rly and GJR was built over time. The GJR reached Birmingham first with a station at Vauxhall opened in July 4th, 1837. This second line was extended to a station adjacent to the LBR station during January 1839.

Other passenger railways had opened earlier. The Liverpool and Manchester Railway was opened September 15th, 1830 with passenger termini at Crown Street, Liverpool and Liverpool Road Manchester. Their railway was a main line between cities and had various branches to Bolton, Wigan and Warrington.

London Euston the terminus of the London & Birmingham was opened in 1837, but it was not until the completion of Kilsby Tunnel (June 24th, 1838) that the line between Birmingham and London was complete.

It is difficult to justify the claim, if the Liverpool & Manchester is considered a main line, but from January 1839 Curzon Street was at the heart of the main line that linked London with the North West.

Aris’s Gazette 28th September 1838, the train arriving...

0C46F7C6-5E6B-4F8A-9C93-078D8FEE5D84.jpeg
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Birmingham Big Wheel is back in Eastside City Park, so some new views of Ice Skate Birmingham with Curzon Street Station.

From the canal bridge on Great Barr Street.



From Curzon Street.

 
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