• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Cholera

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Sandra
Gill & Briggs "History of birmingham" states (vol1. p.429) that "During the cholera epidemic of 1853 a health committee served by a"medical sanitary inspector" had been appointed (in birmingham). This seems to be the only mention in the book, and I would take it to mean a cholera epidemic in birmingham, though it does not specify .
Mike
 

JohnO

master brummie
Near where I now live, in Northumberland, we have the ruins of a 'cholera village'....I pass it every time I drive out of my own village; it's now just a hundred yard, double row of grassy humps with a few bits of masonry showing here and there. Apparently, the cottages had been thatched with heather and, rather than risk further infection, they were set ablaze with the bodies of the former inhabitants still inside - every one had succumb to the cholera!

The first out-break of Asiatic Cholera reached Sunderland, in the North East. in 1831 and raged north-wards into Scotland...killing 51,000 people! In the following ten years or so, there were several more out-breaks across the whole country.
 

Laurie_B

master brummie
The cholera outbreak of 1853 wasn't just restricted to Birmingham,but affected areas such as Wednesbury and Walsall too.This led to the South Staffordshire Waterworks Company being formed at that time to provide clean drinking water.Their first waterworks was in Lichfield.
 

paul stacey

master brummie
hi all
between the late 1700's and 1870's, there were many cholera outbreaks in which thousands died in the UK and Ireland, even in the 20th C, odd villages around Cambridgeshire suffered up till the 1930's and mains water supply to all households.
paul
 

JohnO

master brummie
hi all
between the late 1700's and 1870's, there were many cholera outbreaks in which thousands died in the UK and Ireland, even in the 20th C, odd villages around Cambridgeshire suffered up till the 1930's and mains water supply to all households.
paul

I can't find any evidence of cholera in Britain before 1831....do you have a reference/link? I'd be very interested, ta.
 

paul stacey

master brummie
hi johnO
kings lynn had an out break in aug 1824,200, died, but I am not sure that it has always been call cholera I believe it was called black water fever at one time and maybe other names in various parts of the world?
paul
 

lencops

gone but not forgotten
Joseph Lucas, a devout teetotaller died of cholera in Naples circa 1902 because he drank water when every one else drank wine, he is buried in Moseley Church. Len.
 
Top