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Childhood Memories

Diane1947

master brummie
Richard more innocent days back then also. Regarding happy days I was a very nervous kind of child.
However, back to the coal fires. I was born 1947, and around about then my Mother had the coal fire place put in. Before that apparent it was the black fire range type. My nan apparently cooked on one.
You were supposed to get permission from the council to have one fitted In their houses.
Mum didn’t, and someone reported her, well some neighbour, and I think she had to pay some small fine.
 

Richarddye

master brummie
Richard more innocent days back then also. Regarding happy days I was a very nervous kind of child.
However, back to the coal fires. I was born 1947, and around about then my Mother had the coal fire place put in. Before that apparent it was the black fire range type. My nan apparently cooked on one.
You were supposed to get permission from the council to have one fitted In their houses.
Mum didn’t, and someone reported her, well some neighbour, and I think she had to pay some small fine.
Diane, for sure on the innocence, I was born in 43! Like Pete said not being a prood, I am amazed at what people do and say, for no apparent reason. I guess we all need to get over that. When I was growing up breaking milk bottles and throwing stones at street lights was really daring stuff!
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
Diane, for sure on the innocence, I was born in 43! Like Pete said not being a prood, I am amazed at what people do and say, for no apparent reason. I guess we all need to get over that. When I was growing up breaking milk bottles and throwing stones at street lights was really daring stuff!
you rascal.:grinning:
 

izzy eckerslike

Yaw've med my day yaw ave
Some of my earliest memories are going to see Auntie Sis & uncle Tom in their prefab in Yardley Wood Rd aged 4 in 1950, we would cross into the park to play on the mini golf pitch & put with uncle Tom.
I remember us going home in winter sometimes and the smog will have suddenly come down and the No 11 bus would have to crawl along with the conductor walking in front. Then the engine would overheat and the bus would have to stop for 15 minutes so it took ages to get back to Kings Norton, I would fall asleep and have to be carried off the bus.

I remember similar trips to Grandad Gray in Denaby Grove, Yardley wood , his house was full of curios brought back from Brazil by my Gt grandparents who ran some kind of business there.
Glass domes with humming birds and giant beetles and butterflies. His garden always had sweet peas and every time i smell one it takes me back. The lovely smell of his Golden cut tobacco which he smoked in clay pipes
There was also an air raid shelter with trays of apples that were being stored and that smell was lovely as well.
 

adap2it

master brummie
I recall the days when we had a modern grate and subsequent paraffin heater. Our dad used to pick up the paraffin at a filling station on Lozells Rd. It certainly was a lot easier than the open fire experience. However, it happened one day that the burner in the heater kept flaring up and our mom was freaking out. She took the paraffin can back to the filling station, which was quite a walk from Paddington St and found out it was petrol, not paraffin. could have been a major disaster...
Dave A
 

Radiorails

master brummie
During the 1926 General Strike, in the Potteries (itself a coal mining district) young children, often orphaned (being brought up by eldest girl) or have only one parent still alive, went on the slag heaps searching for bits of coal or large slack in order to have a fire in the grate. The grate was used for cooking and washing water and as a bonus kept the place warm. I knew this from someone who was nine years old at the time.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Paraffin heaters could be very dangerous if not treated and sited with care. They were responsible for many fires - and deaths as a result.
Paraffin, blue or pink coloured. was delivered in many places. Known here as 'the oil man'.
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
Paraffin heaters could be very dangerous if not treated and sited with care. They were responsible for many fires - and deaths as a result.
Paraffin, blue or pink coloured. was delivered in many places. Known here as 'the oil man'.
the esso ble duller....... mom always used one in the kitchen. it had a glass bottle in the back of it, one day she put a refill in and it did not seat properly. it flooded and set on fire. luckily i was at home. i picked it up and threw it in the garden.
 

Attachments

Dave89

master brummie
the esso ble duller....... mom always used one in the kitchen. it had a glass bottle in the back of it, one day she put a refill in and it did not seat properly. it flooded and set on fire. luckily i was at home. i picked it up and threw it in the garden.
Hi Pete,

I don't blame you, those drip feed fires were notorious for faults, We did have one
when they first came out, but soon got rid of it. The conventional paraffin fires never
seemed to give any bother though, you just had to keep the wicks trimmed.
I liked the smell of an oil stove actually, but my missus hated it.

Kind regards
Dave
 

Nico

master brummie
Diane, I remember picking up the slack actually from anywhere we could find it. And the newspaper, it seemed when I was doing it, somehow I got the fire going but also managed to set the newspaper on fire! My father was not pleased because I always seemed to use the morning paper that he had not read!
Happy Days (I think)!
My Nan used to examine the coal that was delivered tipped from hessian sacks. The coal men were very strong. He tipped it on to a piece of corrugated iron on the garden to keep it dry near the house, but she never covered it. When it was wet it used to spit when lit and crack and bang. So she would put the fireguard up. She used to moan often saying he had given her a load of 'nutty slack'. Grandads mum, used to paint her coal. She said someone was stealing it. She also painted a line on the wall, to see if it went down. She kept it as did my dad's mum, under the stairs in the cubby hole. We called ours the bung 'ole. As everything got bunged in it. So, I always thought they were called bungoles.
 

Nico

master brummie
Hi Pete,

I don't blame you, those drip feed fires were notorious for faults, We did have one
when they first came out, but soon got rid of it. The conventional paraffin fires never
seemed to give any bother though, you just had to keep the wicks trimmed.
I liked the smell of an oil stove actually, but my missus hated it.

Kind regards
Dave
We were watching a Miss Marple, I said to my partner, lots of people were 'killed' like this, in dramas,
and in films turning on the gas on the little bedrooms fires. We had ours taken out. All houses had them as I recall but I never saw one lit. Mum said they were dangerous. I remember Nan on about women who put their head in the gas oven. A friend of ours used to dry her long hair in the oven. She lay on the kitchen "flowa" as pronounced by my nan, put cushions under her head and put her hair in" th'oven." "Bluurgh!" shuddered nan "the filthy cat!"
 

Richarddye

master brummie
My Nan used to examine the coal that was delivered tipped from hessian sacks. The coal men were very strong. He tipped it on to a piece of corrugated iron on the garden to keep it dry near the house, but she never covered it. When it was wet it used to spit when lit and crack and bang. So she would put the fireguard up. She used to moan often saying he had given her a load of 'nutty slack'. Grandads mum, used to paint her coal. She said someone was stealing it. She also painted a line on the wall, to see if it went down. She kept it as did my dad's mum, under the stairs in the cubby hole. We called ours the bung 'ole. As everything got bunged in it. So, I always thought they were called bungoles.
Nico, our coal shed (if you could call it that) was at the back of our house down a narrow entry. I had to go down every day with a coal scuttle fill it up and carry it into the house. When we needEd more coal my mother would leave it where I kept my bike which was my bedroom. No words just an empty scuttle silently speaking!
 

Nico

master brummie
Richard more innocent days back then also. Regarding happy days I was a very nervous kind of child.
However, back to the coal fires. I was born 1947, and around about then my Mother had the coal fire place put in. Before that apparent it was the black fire range type. My nan apparently cooked on one.
You were supposed to get permission from the council to have one fitted In their houses.
Mum didn’t, and someone reported her, well some neighbour, and I think she had to pay some small fine.
I was a nervous child too. We only threw stones at each other. Never at people's property. Only bad kids did that.My school mate moved some little red lanterns they used to have round road works, and a car went in the hole in the dark. He was mortified. He daren't tell his dad as he would have been belted. With a belt. Some kids played truant, and got in to a neighbour's house whilst she was at work, and made tea ate biscuits and watcher her TV. I think they broke in. It was unheard of then, a huge scandal, they left their school blazers behind with their names sewn in.
 

Nico

master brummie
Nico, our coal shed (if you could call it that) was at the back of our house down a narrow entry. I had to go down every day with a coal scuttle fill it up and carry it into the house. When we needEd more coal my mother would leave it where I kept my bike which was my bedroom. No words just an empty scuttle silently speaking!
Some houses built during the war, had little coal bunkers with a lid on top and a little door in the bottom. I can see one from here now. My friends kept their rabbit in it. We had a coal shed next to the outside loo. We used it for tools and things. The Coal 'ouse. Again I grew up thinking it was a colowse.
 

Richarddye

master brummie
I was a nervous child too. We only threw stones at each other. Never at people's property. Only bad kids did that.My school mate moved some little red lanterns they used to have round road works, and a car went in the hole in the dark. He was mortified. He daren't tell his dad as he would have been belted. With a belt. Some kids played truant, and got in to a neighbour's house whilst she was at work, and made tea ate biscuits and watcher her TV. I think they broke in. It was unheard of then, a huge scandal, they left their school blazers behind with their names sewn in.
Now almost nothing would happen!
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I believe many properties had a brick built outdoor 'coal house' as part of their property. A house I lived in did, in fact, in my younger days, I built a small rockery against the exterior rear wall.
I wonder what people use them for these days, where they only have central heating? A shed maybe? Rather like the front gardens which are now car parks
 

Diane1947

master brummie
I was a nervous child too. We only threw stones at each other. Never at people's property. Only bad kids did that.My school mate moved some little red lanterns they used to have round road works, and a car went in the hole in the dark. He was mortified. He daren't tell his dad as he would have been belted. With a belt. Some kids played truant, and got in to a neighbour's house whilst she was at work, and made tea ate biscuits and watcher her TV. I think they broke in. It was unheard of then, a huge scandal, they left their school blazers behind with their names sewn in.
When I was around 6 or 7 I do recall being in the infant school, but not the first year. A boy in my class showed me a small green bottle about the size of smelling salts. It may have been much smaller, but way back then, and even now I kind of see it. He had brought from home, I said what’s in it or what’s that he said poison, and I’m going to poison you.
So me being me took it on board. My late sister said at times I was like a dustbin taking to much rubbish in.
The boy only lived down the road from me, had to pass his house on the way to, and from school. At home time I started to use another gate, and came home via a different road. In case he poisoned me lol.I could not wait for junior school to come around. Separate playgrounds for boys and girls.
I still remember the boys name crystal clear.
Writing about this I cannot remembered my Mum taking me or picking me up from school only I guess the first day.
 

Nico

master brummie
I believe many properties had a brick built outdoor 'coal house' as part of their property. A house I lived in did, in fact, in my younger days, I built a small rockery against the exterior rear wall.
I wonder what people use them for these days, where they only have central heating? A shed maybe? Rather like the front gardens which are now car parks
That's what ours was built on to the pantry then the outside loo then the water butt then a wooden shed. All the houses I lived in had them. Like now except it houses the boiler now and has been made to be inside. We put tools and deckchairs in and flower pots, fishing rods, anything, zinc baths and buckets.
 
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