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Childhood Memories

Nico

master brummie
I can remember the same such things Nico, lovely memories of family and having grannie around as ours lived with us... it was our childhood, hasn't life changed? I can remember all those house callers except the egg man!
Wendy
Nan always got a kiss off the egg man. Then I saw a TV series come up A Kiss off The Egg Man.
I forgot the road sweeper with his little cart. Mum and dad had a fish man too. The Rag and bone man's son was in my class
 

Nico

master brummie
I can remember the same such things Nico, lovely memories of family and having grannie around as ours lived with us... it was our childhood, hasn't life changed? I can remember all those house callers except the egg man!
Wendy
Nan lived with us too.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Nick,

Rural and an island - the police only have to watch the airports and a two ferry terminals - if the criminals aren't there then thet are somewhere on the island. Youngsters are kept busy with school and more school (frontiserio) in the evening, If they've got any spare time after that, many of them are helping the family on their land. Cities are more of a problem, of course, but we only have a few of those. I don't need guard dogs as my neighbours will quickly spot a stranger and watch him like a hawk until he leaves or settles.

Maurice :cool:
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dracula
just put a copy of your profile in the window. that will keep intruders away:).... beware of the Maurice.... we had a burglar look through the window when i was watching the tv, back in the 50s.my dad ran out but he had legged it.
 
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Radiorails

master brummie
In my dealings with nursing/care homes and hospitals over the last 25 years it is apparent that the larger percentage of residents are people who have retired to this area or moved here for business purposes. Few are native born. The problem for many is that their families are miles away often in another country. But that is how the world has changed since the widespread movements of people in the last hundred years.
 

Nico

master brummie
In my dealings with nursing/care homes and hospitals over the last 25 years it is apparent that the larger percentage of residents are people who have retired to this area or moved here for business purposes. Few are native born. The problem for many is that their families are miles away often in another country. But that is how the world has changed since the widespread movements of people in the last hundred years.
 

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Nico

master brummie
As well as the rag and bone man's horse drawn cart, there was a flower seller and the milkman till I was 5 because we moved house = different milk round. The Midland Counties I think it was after had the battery powered open little van, with the laboured whine of the engine and the rattle of the milk crates. The vegetable man had a horse drawn cart too but he tethered it around the corner and the wares were displayed like a market stall. The one in the picture is when I used to stay with my mate's relations in Ireland.
We can't even get a window cleaner now they say the house is too high? The ice cream man is not allowed to stop where we live yet cars park on the pavement and double yellers and lorries block drives.
 

Nico

master brummie
I sent the photo to my old friend over the water she said the wagon was an old milk float converted. She was very high in animal welfare assuring me the horse was well cared for. He had a waterproof blanket on sometimes. Duggie didn't have to tell him he just clicked and the horse would move to the next house whilst he was delivering his produce.
My mate's gran used to buy 2 stone of potatoes. Great big round round ones. She said they came from Belfast? They were the best? They did hold up in a lovely potato cake made in the frying pan.
 

Nico

master brummie
I just remembered a type of sweet. My partner had them in France too. They were white small oblong wrapped, hard but then chewy, not a boiled sweet, I struggled with the wrap I often ended up eating paper. They tasted of mint.
 

Nico

master brummie
Prior to supermarkets many women bough 1 or 2 stone of potatoes, carefully chosen and weighed.
View attachment 141440
I wish Nan had kept her scales and weights. I used to play with them. Her pan was smaller , more open. Grandad had a meat scale too in brass, looked like a thermometer a bit, just a big hook you hung the meat on and the pointer showed the weight. Yes they were dead on with the weight. And the cheese wire.

I remember Nan unpacking her shopping, all in white for meat and brown for fruit and veg paper bags. She fetched her soaked peas in her own dish and her dripping when she brought her own bowl. She sang too, never stopped. Sometimes she would stick a bunch of bananas on her head and sing, " I, I, I, I, I, I like you vaiiiiiry much, I, I, I, I, I, I think your grand!" in a funny voice. I never realised she was imitating Carmen Miranda till much later in.
She called Tarantella tomatos taranatula.
 

Nico

master brummie
While I remember, Nan used to buy a sliced white loaf in a see through wrapper with a red logo called 66. She called it her Clickety Click loaf. And a little bag of Chipples for me. You can get them in huge bags in France I forget what they are called. But they have a fancy name don't they? We had one bakery too, Thelma's who gave you the baker's dozen for everything. Unheard of now I would think.
 

Nico

master brummie
French family life is the same but they still have crime. Maybe rural is better? I find they have great respect for anybody especially older people. It's always Monsieur. et Madame, everywhere you come in to contact, unless you say otherwise. Tradesmen and gardeners say bonjour and shakehands always, road workers say bonjour. I am told it is starting to die out with younger people they say they are becoming Americanised.
At the two funerals over there I attended, all the undertakers said bonjour to everybody at the funeral and they shook hands with the immediate family, from the conductor, driver, pall bearers, even the grave diggers who followed us at the graveside and made the sign of the cross with the holy water sprinkler. What I thought I gave back to them and which I felt they greatly appreciated was proper conversation, not just polite deference, and greatly so with the ambulance staff and porters who seemed to go unnoticed who said as much, to me.
 

acklam19

master brummie
Hl all.my nan (dads mom) was something special she lost my grandad in the first world war and was left with six children under 13 to bring up she later married and had 4 more daughters yet in my memory she was always laughing and cheerful, she did like her snuff though, l used to watch put a pinch on the back of her hand and sniff away, on both her knuckles was love and hate with other faded tattoos up her arms this was because she and my grandad were members of Brum canal boat people. Regards acklam19
 

Nico

master brummie
Nan's neighbour Alice took snuff. It used to trickle 'like 2 candles' said mum. My friend's sister in law is a 'narrowboat person'. I know they scatter flowers on the canal for funerals. I don't know if they would go up to Brum on it from here. Canals were a main mode of transport weren't they and the towpaths were kept clear and clean. And the canals. Some of my birth family I discovered were smugglers on the canal. That was a new one on me!
The Swan in Upton on Severn has every beam in the long bar covered with barge names. I visited Naburn marina there was much memorablia and historical items to be had. Chap told me all the painted utensils had a meaning.
 

Nico

master brummie
Nan's neighbour Alice took snuff. It used to trickle 'like 2 candles' said mum. My friend's sister in law is a 'narrowboat person'. I know they scatter flowers on the canal for funerals. I don't know if they would go up to Brum on it from here. Canals were a main mode of transport weren't they and the towpaths were kept clear and clean. And the canals. Some of my birth family I discovered were smugglers on the canal. That was a new one on me!
The Swan in Upton on Severn has every beam in the long bar covered with barge names. I visited Naburn marina there was much memorablia and historical items to be had. Chap told me all the painted utensils had a meaning.
 

Nico

master brummie
Nan's birthday so I am thinking about her, (again) another trip to the crem, anything like a daisy was her favourite, born a week apart in their' horror scopes' as Nan called them, but my 2 grandmothers were so different. Nan would say after lunch, "I am going to change me,.... for a bottle of Guinness!" and change out of her work clothes to a home knit twin set and a tweed skirt. Put her feet up on what she called the poofie, and knitted and read Woman's Weekly and the Peoples' Friend, and helped herself from a huge bag of eclairs and toffees. Then she would changed back again and 'to get the tea on'. My mate liked Nan too, and I liked his, he called for me early at lunch time, to go back to school. She would be singing pop songs in her flowery overall to Terry Wogan, or whistling I was Kaiser Bill's Batman, and we would laugh, when we all tried to whistle together, then make us a coffee, washing drying round the fire.

In about 10 years of my earliest years, our street saw three fires, usually fences. Which became minor social events. Wives on their husband's arms, children all went to inspect the aftermath, at intervals, are you going Nan? I would ask eagerly, "when yer grandad comes home from work and has had his tea". And they did, arm in arm, with lots of others throughout the day I remember a Plymouth Bretheren family going. The old lady was very smart, with very long white hair and a scarf. Our neighbours would cluck and tut and make a brief exchanges with the other neighbours, then go back home. I find that odd now.
The same with accidents. We had a few fatalities as our road became a rat run for lorries to the retail market. One lady made dozens of cups of tea for the shocked in the accident and the neighbours who all came out in couples.
 
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laynot

proper brummie kid
I was at Moseley Grammar School from 1947 to 1952 and although the regular route was the 24 stopping at the traffic lights at the Wake Green Road cross roads, sometimes we'd catch the 1A into Moseley and transfer to the tram which terminated at Alcester Lanes End and then walk home near the Maypole. How those old trams rattled.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Hi Laynot,

I've sent you a private message - click on envelope icon, top right - as we were both at MGS at the same time.

Maurice :cool:
 
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