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Childhood Memories

oldMohawk

master brummie
One childhood memory I have is of my bedroom which was the smallest in the house. It's window looked out on our quiet road on the Beeches Estate but if I looked out of that window now I would see the M6 Motorway. The room was only 7' x 6' so a single bed took up most of the space.

Very early memories are of being woken up, rushed out of bed and taken to the garden shelter because the air-raid sirens had sounded. A small incendiary bomb did hit the house one night but landed in mom and dad's bedroom and my little bedroom was untouched.

Childhood illnesses in those days usually resulted in being confined to bed for a week or more but when I had Scarlett Fever I spent six weeks generally confined to the room reading 'Just William', 'Worzel Gummidge' books and 'Rupert' annuals. It led to a life long love of reading and I was best reader in the class when I went back to school.

With only coal fires downstairs it was a very cold room and I remember waking up to see the inside of the windows completely covered with white patterned ice. Later in my early teen years I used to plug a one bar electric fire into the light socket and sit with it under the sheets to warm the bed !

I somehow found space to build short wave radios and model aeroplanes in the small room and remember late nights lying in bed listening to amatuer radio folks talking from the other side of the world ... a novelty back in those days.
 

Richarddye

master brummie
One childhood memory I have is of my bedroom which was the smallest in the house. It's window looked out on our quiet road on the Beeches Estate but if I looked out of that window now I would see the M6 Motorway. The room was only 7' x 6' so a single bed took up most of the space.

Very early memories are of being woken up, rushed out of bed and taken to the garden shelter because the air-raid sirens had sounded. A small incendiary bomb did hit the house one night but landed in mom and dad's bedroom and my little bedroom was untouched.

Childhood illnesses in those days usually resulted in being confined to bed for a week or more but when I had Scarlett Fever I spent six weeks generally confined to the room reading 'Just William', 'Worzel Gummidge' books and 'Rupert' annuals. It led to a life long love of reading and I was best reader in the class when I went back to school.

With only coal fires downstairs it was a very cold room and I remember waking up to see the inside of the windows completely covered with white patterned ice. Later in my early teen years I used to plug a one bar electric fire into the light socket and sit with it under the sheets to warm the bed !

I somehow found space to build short wave radios and model aeroplanes in the small room and remember late nights lying in bed listening to amatuer radio folks talking from the other side of the world ... a novelty back in those days.
oldMohawk, oh how I remember those old coal fires.....we had more than one, but only the one in the kitchen and at Christmas in the front room were they ever lit! I remember too the frost on the inside of my bedroom windows and the leaky hot water bottles.
I did not have any radios but I kept my bike with me all the time. It was my iron horse.
Thank you for rekindling those memories!
 

Spargone

master brummie
One childhood memory I have is of my bedroom which was the smallest in the house.
I had the little bedroom over the stairs too. Unfortunately various items from previous houses hadn't yet found a home and the room also was a store for all those items needed for decorating, like step ladders.

The result was that it became a terrifying place for me at night, all sorts of strange shadows formed scary creatures with a bit of imagination. Clearly I couldn't continue to sleep in there.

So my dad stripped out the room, built a cupboard that backed out over the stair, fitted a curtain rail over the angled bay window making it flush with the wall, painted and wall-papered it and finally cut down a bed to exactly fit the space.

Then they moved my sister in!
 

Edifi

master brummie
Talking about fires.My father had a cake tin the size of a house brick.He used to save newspapers rip it into bits wet it and add cement .He would let them dry then put them on the fire with the other bits of coal or coke.They helped keep us warm in the winter
 

paul stacey

master brummie
In winter my mom would't light the main living room fire till dad, was nearly home, so we kids, when we got in from school would go in the kitchen with all the gas hobs and oven with door open it was toasty warm, I have always wondered weather anyone else remembers it like that. Paul
 

wendylee

master brummie
Well... My sister says I was a strange child, haha, she says what child likes doing the odd things you did!
I remember ... loving ... cleaning out and laying the coal fire in the back room with the screwed up paper, kindling and the bits of coal, cleaning out mums glass cabinet, placing all the glasses and special coronation cups in to be washed, wiping the shelves etc, I just loved it.
The stove top was another thing I liked cleaning haha, just to stand back and see it sparkling.
The garden was another job I enjoyed I would weed a section of garden at a time, all these things were things i liked doing , it satisfied me to see what I had accomplished.
I think I was a strange child haha:rolleyes:
Leaky hot water bottles and frosty windows definitely a memory of mine too... :D
Thanks for the memories.

Wendy
 

Nico

master brummie
Well... My sister says I was a strange child, haha, she says what child likes doing the odd things you did!
I remember ... loving ... cleaning out and laying the coal fire in the back room with the screwed up paper, kindling and the bits of coal, cleaning out mums glass cabinet, placing all the glasses and special coronation cups in to be washed, wiping the shelves etc, I just loved it.
The stove top was another thing I liked cleaning haha, just to stand back and see it sparkling.
The garden was another job I enjoyed I would weed a section of garden at a time, all these things were things i liked doing , it satisfied me to see what I had accomplished.
I think I was a strange child haha:rolleyes:
Leaky hot water bottles and frosty windows definitely a memory of mine too... :D
Thanks for the memories.

Wendy
Leaky caravans too with water running down the inside of the window. At least we had a holiday!
My poor old gran in her bed next to the coal fire, with her coat on over her nightie, gloves with fingers out, thick checked headcarf, glasses on the end of her nose reading big print books
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Wendy,

I could provide you with a job for life! :) I'm not really a chores person, they get in the way of other things I'd far sooner do at this time in my life!

Maurice :cool:
 

Nico

master brummie
I remember the water in the outside loo freezing over in the pan. Nan wore wooly socks over her stockings. I can see her cooking with her old coat on with her apron on in the kitchen with a small woolly hat too. Fetching in the frozen rigid sheets and the steam coming off the small mangle in the yard, she had to put her foot on it or it slipped. I liked to play with the roller adjusters they reminded me of aeroplanes no idea why, they were grooved and cream and blue. She had a big mangle in the kitchen for sheets. It had an aluminium cover which served as a worktop.Nan called alloominum!
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Pete,

I didn't say I was watching BHF - and I wasn't! :)

But to get this back on thread, I used to love watching my dad repairing shoes with the three-legged iron last, a hammer, and some "rivets", as he used to call them, but were actually tacks. But shoes were always repaired in those days, not intoday's throw away age. One thing that he planted just after the war was a Cox's Orange Pippin apple tree, which I think he ordered from some advertiser in "The Smallholder". When we left the house in 1950s and it was then in it's second year of fruiting. It was still there last year on Google Street View and it must now be over 75 years old.

Maurice :cool:
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
I think that's the idea, Alan. Put on a boring programme and at the end of it is a good time to put out bad news as most of the public will either be asleep or watching some "enthralling" reality show on the other channel! :)

Maurice :cool:
 
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