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Chickens

Edifi

master brummie
During the war in Ikerman St Vauxhall,We kept 3 chickens up the back yard.They were Black Leghorns so I was told.The one we called Peggy because she walked with a LIMP.All the neighbors loved the eggs they laid tho
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
We kept about a dozen in Knowle Road, Sparkhill, but they didn't go with us to Kings Heath. All had names and were bought as day old chicks via an advert in "The Smallholder".

Maurice
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
We had R.I.Rs, Leghorns, and Anconas. If we had to kill one, a guy over the road wrung its neck. Neither Mom nor Dad could bring themselves to do that. Chopping their heads off is the usual way here, and more often than not it is the wife in the family that does it - the men just can't bring themselves to do it! :cool:

Maurice
 

rosie

brummie
I had some chickens but couldn't kill them either! The foxes had a few though by digging deep under the pen in spite of buried chicken wire. Neighbours would come with a few peelings and expect a bag of eggs so it became expensive to keep them for the few eggs we had left. Other neighbours complained about the smell but we had already got rid of them and it turned out to to be the drains in the street!!
rosie.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Rosie,

Your mention of peelings reminded me of my mother mixing peelings with some sort of meal and cooking it in a saucepan for the chickens. They loved it, but what a terrible smell that was.

Maurice
 

rosie

brummie
Maurice, I can't remember what that stuff was called but it was awful! We kept a special old "dixie" type thing to cook it in.
rosie.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
My mother kept a big old saucepan for it, Rosie, and I'm sure the word "poultry" came into it somewhere - but so long ago now! :cool:

Maurice
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
Maurice, you may be thinking of "poultry spice", you would add it to vegetable peeling to cook for the hens
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Mort,

No, we were aware of that - to make the hens lay more eggs - but stopped using it as we found it caused prolapses and we considered it cruel to the hens. Rosie knows the stuff I mean, a sort of meal to bulk up the peelings and vegetable scraps. :)

Maurice
 

rosie

brummie
I think it may have been called "sharps"? It was nasty grey powdery stuff a bit like porridge oats.
rosie.
 

rosie

brummie
I've been searching on the Web but can't find it. There was layer's mash too. Sometime we would hang up a large cabbage stalk for them to peck.
The very best eggs came after I dug the garden and they pulled the worms out! I used to think "Yuk! I'm eating worms"!
rosie.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Well the spice that Morturn referred to was, as I remember, a bit like a gritty powered cinnamon. The meal could have been any old meal - Sharps, the pet food people, may well have marketed it. I just remember the horrid smell when it was cooking! :scream:

Maurice
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
I will eat gammon or lean bacon, mike, provided it is overcooked, i.e. crisp. My other half shudders, but has learned to accept my funny habits! Other than that only chicken or turkey. Goodness knows what any of these animals will eat given the chance!

Maurice
 

bewdley

master brummie
Yes pigs eat anything and everything including the clothes off your back if you don’t keep your eyes on them!!

My son also keeps pigs and here are two of my grandchildren with some of their piglets, the one little one waits for Jack every day and follows him everywhere.

They are adorable, but their parents are not to be messed with; the piglets' parents I mean.
 

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sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
They're certainly putting on weight, Bewdley - the piglets I mean! :) You certainly won't be able to call them piglets much longer. A friend down in Bodmin used to keep goats and they would eat almost anything too, but certainly friendlier than the ones up in the mountains here in Crete. They're too used to the wild life I suppose and are a bit wary of humans, even the farmers responsible for them.

Maurice
 
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