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Chance Glass Factory

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
You're welcome Lyn. There's a huge 'antique' village just outside where we were staying. They had several Chance handkerchief vases but quite dear I thought - still looking for another bargain.
and i know you are sooooo good at finding the bargains pen:D:D

lyn x
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
try this david... its better if you post it as thumbnail rather than full image as you cant enlarge a full image then ..click on image..click on arrow top right of image then click on image again it should enlarge..i hope

lyn

chances glass.jpg
 
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Pedrocut

Master Barmy
If you go to the link the cursor can be moved over to zoom.

The page can be downloaded from the Newspaper Archives as a pdf.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
thanks pedro i didnt do it that way but i have posted it so that we can enlarge the image

lyn
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Sebastian Evans, mentioned in the newspaper article, worked, it appears, at Chance Brothers, Oldbury for ten years. The Wiki mentions the Robin Hood window and other details relating to Birmingham. It would be interesting to follow the history of the window once the 1862 International Exhibition was over. Given that Evans worked for Chance it maybe that it had a customer already. However, I get the impression that despite the religious dimensions in the window it was not made for an ecclesiastical building.
I did, during a quick search, find reference to a stained glass window in a restaurant in West London. Whether it is this window I have no idea but curious none the less.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sebastian_Evans
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmy
Sebastian Evans may have designed the window, but did he copy the depiction of Robin Hood’s Last Shot from someone else’s engraving? He would no doubt show, as he intended, that stained glass could be used for domestic as well as ecclesiastic subjects.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
thanks pen i have replied to your pm...had a nice break away..the highlight was watching at least 150 red kits being fed...fed at 3 oclock every day..got there at 2.30 by which time about 30 kites were hovering around us so they must know when grub is up...bang on 3 a man comes out and emptied a sack of meat onto a grass island and from nowhere the kites just appeared:eek: amazing sight to watch...i took some video footage and photos but wont know how they turned out until i have got them off my camera

lyn
 
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Lady Penelope

master brummie
Hi Lyn, we went to see the kites in Radnorshire - not sure where you saw them. Fascinating to watch.

Alan, yes, I inherited my Nan's but gave it to my daughter. I only usually use celery in cooking.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Just been watching this marvellous month in the life of an Hanois Lighthouse (off Guernsey) keeper filmed in 1994, and although I don't know who made the glass, it reminded me of this thread. Well worth watching with no intrusive music. Read the comments as one of the keepers watched this video many years later after they had all been automated. He said that the difference between then and when he wrote the comment was that both his hair and beard had gone white! Tell me about it! :)


Maurice
 

LOZELLIAN

master brummie
Just been watching this marvellous month in the life of an Hanois Lighthouse (off Guernsey) keeper filmed in 1994, and although I don't know who made the glass, it reminded me of this thread. Well worth watching with no intrusive music. Read the comments as one of the keepers watched this video many years later after they had all been automated. He said that the difference between then and when he wrote the comment was that both his hair and beard had gone white! Tell me about it! :)


Maurice
Hello sospiri,

Just a bit of useless info perhaps, after doing some research into my family history I discovered that my 2nd great grandmother (Hannah) was a member of the Chance Glass family.

Lozellian.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Lozellian,

Almost a claim to fame them! I presume that Chance was her maiden name then? I must admit that I hadn't heard of the company until Wendy opened this thread in 2007, but it's nice to have a bit of Brum industrial history linked to the name.

Maurice
 

JohnWish

master brummie
I have various memories of Chance's. In the early 1960's I went their factory in Smethwick. They were making tubing for fluorescent lights by the 100 foot. It was extruded from a pot in a gulley. A man followed the machine pulling the glass. When he thought the tube was of the correct diameter he took off his cap and flapped to cool it and stop it collapsing.

Nearby a machine was attaching the front face to cathode ray tubes for TV. The tube turned and four gas jets moved in and out, following the round rectangle to form a seal.

I do not where it was made but Chance's also made Hysil laboratory glassware. As an analytical chemist at the time I considered their 300 ml tallform beaker marvellous; much better than the Pyrex equivalent. Even utilitarian objects can have an elegance.
 
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