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Cannon Street Meeting House

Gollyitslolly

proper brummie kid
Thank you Lynn and Mike. The two words being 'High Street' makes sense and the maps are great. I've been trying to imagine what life would have been like for a 20 year old lodger back then, where he would have worked, a mill I presume but I've searched and can't find any info on timber mills. I need lessons in discovery as I'm not getting far. You guys are professionals!
I live in South Australia nowadays so apologies for reply seeming late. Regards Loraine
 

Gollyitslolly

proper brummie kid
Below are two maps. one c1950 showing, with a red arrow, where meeting house yard must have been, the other what presumably was meeting house yard, though on much smaller scale and not labelled on original map

View attachment 141356View attachment 141357
These maps are amazing, thank you so much. I wondered if there are any documentaries or films on the area, with all the production going on there? There was an old film on yesterday (1954) that was set in the 1850's staring Sir John Mills, he played a Northerner he did a good job with the accent. Seeing the clothing and how they interacted was interesting. Thanks again Loraine
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
mike what year is your first map dated because if you look at the bottom of the map there is a timber yard marked out...it could be that george morris worked there as a sawyer

lyn
 

Gollyitslolly

proper brummie kid
He became a timber dealer in London. He married Eliza Warwick who was also from Birmingham. They had two children in Birmingham but looks like one died as a baby, they then moved to London, Bethnal Green, they had 9 children together and he later had two more. On a few of his children's marriage certificates he is listed as timber dealer even many years later.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Lyn
Sorry. missed off date, was c1839
Loraine
The yard must have been largely industrial at that time, as would have been much of the area. A firm William & Joseph Jennens , button & military and naval ornament manufacturers were based there, and in 1856 a malthouse in the yard was offered for sale.
In 1851 a butcher living at no 8 in the yard, Henry Berry was run over and killed in Digbeth .In 1854 a pledge shop (pawnbroker) was advertised in the corner of the yard. In 1854 there would probably have been a lot of disruption in the yard, as the new Rea main sewer would have been excavated , which was to go under the yard.
 
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Gollyitslolly

proper brummie kid
Lyn
Sorry. missed off date, was c1839
Loraine
The yard must have been largely industrial at that time, as would have been much of the area. A firm William & Joseph Jennens , button & military and naval ornament manufacturers were based there, and in 1856 a malthouse in the yard was offered for sale.
In 1851 a butcher living at no 8 in the yard, Henry Berry was run over and killed in Digbeth .In 1854 a pledge shop (pawnbroker) was advertised in the corner of the yard. In 1854 there would probably have been a lot of disruption in the yard, as the new Rea main sewer would have been excavated , which was to go under the yard.
Fascinating stuff! Thank you.
 

Gollyitslolly

proper brummie kid
There is an interesting short video on YouTube showing an artist drawing in color of Birmingham in the 1800's. I took a screen shot as Digbeth is clear to see and what must be the lower Meeting House Yard. The file is too large to attach. I'll try work out how to attach.
 

Gollyitslolly

proper brummie kid
It is called 'A tour of 18 century Birmingham' by britononfilm - it is all one word. Last for 4.18, very clear mapped drawings.
Cheers Loraine
 
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