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Bus Stops

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Moi aussie, if I had got a life I might be a lot richer now, but being on public transport was my idea of heaven. Since the buses lost their individuality, my interest moved to planes. Greatest moment upgraded to first on an Emirates flight from Dubai to the Seychelles. Last year flew from BHX for the first time in a number of years, for an international airport, it lacks something, much more impressed with Manchester, sorry but it needs a boost.
Bob
 

Spargone

master brummie
Yes Alan, bus stops used to be very close to junctions. There is a photo somewhere on the forum of a bus stop outside Lloyds Bank right on the Five Ways junction.
This bus stop in Harborne High Street where I caught a bus this morning is right on the junction and many times I have been trapped with my car in the side street waiting for a bus stopped right across the junction to move away from the stop.
View attachment 138895
That bus stop is beyond stupid. It looks like a bus bay has been provided, allowing traffic to flow past a stopped bus, then some bright spark has added a zebra crossing up ahead with its zig-zags fouling the bus bay, with the result that the bus stop has been moved back to a barely legal position. I see that the bay now provides for disabled parking, which rather defeats the purpose of the zig-zags, namely to provide clear line of sight to the ends of the zebra crossing.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Far more orderly I expect outside cities, it is in the SW anyway. There will always be those have who 'haven't a minute to live' style lives, more is the pity for them.
 
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DavidGrain

master brummie
I was quite fond of our round enamel bus stop signs, quite distinctive. I recall some had the word stage on the top, I assume a fair increment?

Were there request stops and compulsory stops too?

Were there also some in white and other in blue?

The white with red lettering were compulsory stops and the white with blue lettering were request stops. I think that right to the end of the circular stops there were some older request stops which were blue with white lettering. I have a vague recollection of red with white lettering old compulsory stops.

There were also round Midland Red stop signs which were only for use within the city boundary.
1573139000826.png
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Is'nt it strange that we were able to understand the sign and the words Bus Stop wherever they were and di not have to have a picture of a bus, to indicate what they were and now comes the serious question, fingers poised for the answer. Are the modern bus stop signs a legal requirement brought in by statute or are they just up by general agreement to take away the last vestiges of individuality from towns and countryside?

Bob
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
Is'nt it strange that we were able to understand the sign and the words Bus Stop wherever they were and di not have to have a picture of a bus, to indicate what they were and now comes the serious question, fingers poised for the answer. Are the modern bus stop signs a legal requirement brought in by statute or are they just up by general agreement to take away the last vestiges of individuality from towns and countryside?

Bob
Before anyone says EU, bus stops in Germany usually are yellow and have a large capital H for Haltestelle so it is not an EU regulation.
For a bit of fun look at
 

Richarddye

master brummie
Before anyone says EU, bus stops in Germany usually are yellow and have a large capital H for Haltestelle so it is not an EU regulation.
For a bit of fun look at
I think its all about the non readers of the language! We have to use what are basically symbols or pictures. The same in the US we use pictures instead of words to show people. (my how complicated BUS is). It also seems sometimes that the sign maker is someone's brother in law.
 

Spargone

master brummie
Before anyone says EU, bus stops in Germany usually are yellow and have a large capital H for Haltestelle so it is not an EU regulation.
For a bit of fun look at
I think the design of UK bus stops is down to the local authority. Some authorities use a pictogram of a bus but Birmingham district doesn't. We seem to be in the process of changing from one with a small pictogram of a bus, front-on, in a circle, along with an 'n' in a circle to a design with triangles and diamonds, probably supposed to be a variant of 'WM'.
wmbusstop.jpg
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I think the design of UK bus stops is down to the local authority. Some authorities use a pictogram of a bus but Birmingham district doesn't. We seem to be in the process of changing from one with a small pictogram of a bus, front-on, in a circle, along with an 'n' in a circle to a design with triangles and diamonds, probably supposed to be a variant of 'WM'.
View attachment 138923
Just a meaningless design, I suggest, to anyone not resident.
 

roly

master brummie
Here we go again, somewhere in the system there was a Birmingham round bus stop but it was yellow, I think it is a wartime memory, it was not a tram or trolley bus stop. I am sure,as I can visualise it now.
Bob
I think they were " football specials " There was one in Victoria Square in the mid 70s
 

Radiorails

master brummie
In a post that I made on BHF some while ago, I referred to the yellow circular bus stops. I have never found out when they were introduced and when they were abandoned.
In the previous post (37) there are two blue with white request stops signs, The yellow one I remember was like that but yellow and black I believe. The white backgrounds with blue lettering (request) and red lettering (compulsory), these were a later introduction (1960's I think) which were more distinctive with direction of travel and route number. Earlier compulsory stops were red with white lettering. I never saw those football signs prior to 1954 so believe they were a 1960's style. Tramcar stops were rectangular re or blue with white lettering. Trolley bus stops were hexagonal but I cannot be sure of their colours. Presumably the same colours as those of buses.
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
In a post that I made on BHF some while ago, I referred to the yellow circular bus stops. I have never found out when they were introduced and when they were abandoned.
In the previous post (37) there are two blue with white request stops signs, The yellow one I remember was like that but yellow and black I believe. The white backgrounds with blue lettering (request) and red lettering (compulsory), these were a later introduction (1960's I think) which were more distinctive with direction of travel and route number. Earlier compulsory stops were red with white lettering. I never saw those football signs prior to 1954 so believe they were a 1960's style. Tramcar stops were rectangular re or blue with white lettering. Trolley bus stops were hexagonal but I cannot be sure of their colours. Presumably the same colours as those of buses.
My memory is identical to yours, the very old pattern with black on a yellow background, but I am sure it was prior to the fifties. I can remember the red/blue on white, and the new shape bus stops, but never saw the yellow football ones or can remember any with route numbers on them.
Bob
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
My memory is identical to yours, the very old pattern with black on a yellow background, but I am sure it was prior to the fifties. I can remember the red/blue on white, and the new shape bus stops, but never saw the yellow football ones or can remember any with route numbers on them.
Bob

All the city centre bus stops had the route numbers on them as each route had its own stop in places like New Street, Corporation Street. Colmore Row etc.
 
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