• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Bus Chassis

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
THIS THREAD WAS CREATED FROM AN ORIGINAL COMMENT BY mw0njm AS SHOWN IN THE FIRST QUOTE BELOW

[QUOTE="mw0njm., post: 655809, member: 112577"]
does anyone remember bus chassis being driven along washwoodheath rd to mcw. with the driver wearing a biggles hat and goggles? or am i being daft as usual lol.



Edit Reply by Bob Ensor: [/QUOTE]
I remember seeing a lot of chassis being driven around those guys would be bundled up like Scott going to the Artic
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
I remember them too, in my case during the 50s. What a miserable job that must've been.
You can be sure those guys were looking forward to a hot cuppa some where.
I recall going to Browns Lane the Jag factory in the 70s and Daimler limos coming out with no coach work it been so long ago I do not even recall how I knew they were DS 420's perhaps they had the front grill.
 

Elmdon Boy

master brummie
In the 60s my Dad was a trade plate driver delivering new vehicles all around the country, various types but predometry types out of Longbridge. He used to have van chassis to deliver to a coach builder I think Luton way. They were literally just the chassis with engine and gearbox and drive shaft. The drivers seat was made from wood packing cases and roughly bolted to the floor. Sometimes there was no windscreen but usually this was in place to give some protection.
All drivers hated them but they all had to do them usually once a month.
In the winter he used to have that many layers of coats he resembled the Mitchelin man, together with some rolled up foam to soften the seat.
In complete contrast I remember him having to deliver an Aston Martin DB4 to Newport Pagnell.
All these vehicles were usually parked up outside our house overnight so he could get an early getaway the next morning, even down to the occasional single decker bus from Metro Cammell, usually export ones for delivery to London docks.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
Reference the chassis pic in post#7 BON 531C in Bull Street on 10th January 1979. It had been re-bodied after a fire.
Bon531c_Snow.jpg
 
Last edited:

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
In the 60s my Dad was a trade plate driver delivering new vehicles all around the country, various types but predometry types out of Longbridge. He used to have van chassis to deliver to a coach builder I think Luton way. They were literally just the chassis with engine and gearbox and drive shaft. The drivers seat was made from wood packing cases and roughly bolted to the floor. Sometimes there was no windscreen but usually this was in place to give some protection.
All drivers hated them but they all had to do them usually once a month.
In the winter he used to have that many layers of coats he resembled the Mitchelin man, together with some rolled up foam to soften the seat.
In complete contrast I remember him having to deliver an Aston Martin DB4 to Newport Pagnell.
All these vehicles were usually parked up outside our house overnight so he could get an early getaway the next morning, even down to the occasional single decker bus from Metro Cammell, usually export ones for delivery to London docks.
My pop also delivered cars to the docks, he worked at Austin's he would leave work walk over the road at Longbridge to a Company called James Car Delivery,. get a car and drive to the docks then hitch a lift back to Brum,. then go to work the same day, he delivered a lot of Healey 3000's going to America I will ask if he was ever dressed like a Yeti driving a chassis
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I recall someone, living nearby, who drove new Singer and Hillman cars. I don't know where they went but I do remember they were on trade plates (red letters on a white background) and the chromium plating was covered in a pink coloured film.
You could often see men, with trade plates beneath their arms, thumbing lifts on the major A type roads..
 

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
I wonder were those a temporary cab that was installed the single cab most certainly looks like it
The same trade plate in both pics and the same puddle in the pics taken from the same place promo pics ?.
 

boomy

master brummie
I wonder were those a temporary cab that was installed the single cab most certainly looks like it
The same trade plate in both pics and the same puddle in the pics taken from the same place promo pics ?.
Bob,
Both cabs were temporary to give drivers some protection from the weather.
I took the pictures myself close to Stonebridge island about 1967.
Boomy
 
Top