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Broad Street Hospital

Jayell

master brummie
That was my bus stopping outside the hospital!! Either the No. 9 Quinton or the No. 7 Portland Road.
 
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ladywood

Guest
I might be able to help you with some Hansons.
I have researched them from Worcs 1790's to Aston Birmingham 1840's.
Perry, Powell and Plaistow, Chambers are some connections.

ladywood
 
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BernardR

Guest
Mossy did you have the female physio that had been thrown out by Attila the Hun for cruelty?
 
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BernardR

Guest
My Mother attended the 'Cripples Hospital' as she had one leg longer than the other. She had to wear leg irons as a Kid and one day when she was really fed up with them she gave them to the 'rag and bone' man in exchange for a goldfish or whatever he was offering. Her poor mother went spare as they could not afford to replace them.
 
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ron clarke

Guest
i had polio at the age of 8 months 1n 1950. i used to attend the royal orthopedic clinic in broad st between 1960 to 1990
i used to have my boots adapted to fit a caliper in the metal dept and also visited my surgeon as an outpatient his name was mr mhm harrison. he porformed several operations on me between 1960 to 1967 at the woodlands royal orthopedic hospital bristol rd nr selly oak, and i also went in to the forelands for two weeks while they decorated wards 4/5 during one of my woodlands stays. the forlands is now an housing estate. the broad st hospital is now old orleans this building was used for chiropody and i think physio. the woodlands is still operating as an orthopedic hospital


ron clarke
 
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ladywood

Guest
i had polio at the age of 8 months 1n 1950. i used to attend the royal orthopedic clinic in broad st between 1960 to 1990
i used to have my boots adapted to fit a caliper in the metal dept and also visited my surgeon as an outpatient his name was mr mhm harrison. he porformed several operations on me between 1960 to 1967 at the woodlands royal orthopedic hospital bristol rd nr selly oak, and i also went in to the forelands for two weeks while they decorated wards 4/5 during one of my woodlands stays. the forlands is now an housing estate. the broad st hospital is now old orleans this building was used for chiropody and i think physio. the woodlands is still operating as an orthopedic hospital


ron clarke
Hi Ron, I remember The Orthopedic Hospital on Broad Street from my childhood.
The fifties. Ambulances and crutches.
I also remember the Woodlands on the Bristol Road in the early 60's, when I was a student.
I hope that both the hospitals were of some help to you.

ladywood
 
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ron clarke

Guest
hi ladywood.
yes they did some good work at the woodlands and still do. i had a few operations there some were a success some were'nt and some were pioneering. bit of a guinee pig sometimes :D but i never refused any medical help. i had some good times during my stays in the woodlands. wonder if you remember any off these names, mr donelly miss bennett and mrs taylor educational teachers to the kids on wards 4 & 5. mr leather who worked in the plaster room then later he became a male sister on ward 4 or 5. sister salmon on mens ward 4. sister mckenzie on kids ward five. and a couple of notorious patients named billy rock what a terror and alan tasker both on kids ward 5. remember like it was yesterday lol:). well must shut up now as i could go on all night. all the best
ron clarke.
 
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ladywood

Guest
Dear Ron, I'm afraid I don't know any of the people at Woodlands, so can't be of much help.
All the best anyway.

ladywood
 

veegee

master brummie
I too went to the Orthopedic in the 1950's. I remember having to pick marbles up with my toes.

Also, having wet rubber sheets wrapped around my legs and electric cables being pushed inside sheets, the cables were connected to a machine of some sort, the nurse would throw a switch on the machine which sent electric shocks up and down my legs!! HORRIBLE !

I don't really know why I had this done or whether did me any good ??
 

dougie

New Member
I worked at the orthopaedic in the 60s for about 10 months in boot making department which was a building on the left hand side of the main building it was a 3 story building with the metal shop on the ground floor boot and shoe department on the 2nd floor and the sewing department on the top floor.It is over 40 years ago since I worked there but I still have very fond memories of the people I worked with there George,Ken,Don,Bill,the 2 Harrys,Ray,Garry the Australian and Albert who retired while i was there on the day he retired we all sang puppet on a string for him happy days and happy memories.
 
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Stitcher

Guest
View attachment 64069
How many members know that there was a Royal Orthopaedic Hospital in Newhall Street?? This picture shows Little patients with the matron and nurses in 1897. An Orthopaedic Hospital
was in fact first established in Birmingham in the year 1817.
 
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Stitcher

Guest

I remember my M.I. Law god bless her when she was first treated for hip trouble at this establishment.
stitcher
 

Attachments

frankbck

knowlegable brummie
I was a 10 year old (approx) when I got my shock treatment at The Royal Orthopedic, My Doctor was Mr Leather, he was the father of Dianne Leather, the first woman in the world to run a sub 4 minute mile, which she did about 3 or 4 weeks after Roger Bannister ran the very first, but where he was feted and had all the banners and flags etc, she was hardly remembered for it.

Frank
 

PWE

New Member
That was my bus stopping outside the hospital!! Either the No. 9 Quinton or the No. 7 Portland Road.
Hi. That is a No 5 bus. It used to travel from the terminus at the bottom of Selsey Road/ Portland Road to Perry Common, Court Lane. Then it came back as the Number 7. There was also a No 6 bus that began its route at Willow Avenue/ Sandon Road and then went in the same direction once the 2 buses joined on the Hagley Road. The No 9 still survives to this day.
 

PWE

New Member
My mother Gwendoline Eckersley was born in December 1917 when her mother Leah Adams was caretaker at the Cripples' Hospital on Broad Street/ Sheepcote Street (I'm sure it's mentioned on her birth certificate), so she lived out her childhood in there before moving to Poplar Road, Bearwood, when she was about 18. Every time we went past she would always point it out to me and tell me that was where she used to live when she was my age, but I never took much interest, being so young. I wish she was still alive to tell me all about it once more.
 
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Margaret21

New Member
I used to attend The Cripples Hospital in the 1940s because of my right foot turning in. This name was carved into the stone on the top of the building. No “Royal” or “Orthopaedic” in those days. Today it is a noisy club but I look up and see the three top right windows which used to be the children’s ward. All the foot strengthening exercises I had to do (picking up marbles with my toes) had no affect at all and my foot turns in to this day!
 
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