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Botanical Brew Stone Jars

cookie273uk

master brummie
I discovered these old jars in a broken down old shed at the bottom of the garden of the house we had just purchased in 1961, never seen anything like them before. The are now on display in my kitchen bay window. Would anybody know what they contained, and are they collectable ?? Ericx1.jpg
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmy
I discovered these old jars in a broken down old shed at the bottom of the garden of the house we had just purchased in 1961, never seen anything like them before. The are now on display in my kitchen bay window. Would anybody know what they contained, and are they collectable ?? EricView attachment 115953
They seem to be collectible as there are similar ones on eBay, selling for around 15 quid, and one at 30 quid from Liverpool.

In 1940 Howarth Bros seem to be at 70 Compton Street, Nechells, advertising for a horse driver and a motor driven salesman. But in 1943 it seems they sold up.
 

cookie273uk

master brummie
Thanks Pedrocut, I'm not selling them, I have had them for 55 years and have become attached to them, just wondered what they would have contained, one did have a dark red liquid in it, smelt like wine but tasted terrible ! Eric
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Botanical brewing is a simple process involving herbs and plant roots. Thomas Fentiman's original recipe involved milling ginger roots before putting them into copper steam-jacketed pans and leaving them to simmer to release their flavour.

I have two or three of the large stone bottles and a couple of smaller ones. They were for brewing - both alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. But they were sold in shops, without names of course and could be used for storage of many liquids that needed a more secure than glass kind of storage and on many occasions needed to be kept cool. and away from inquisitive eyes. :D
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
I have seen a similar stone bottle with the name ‘R Whites’ who as we know make lemonade. It may have actually been ‘R Whites Birmingham or Aston’, cannot quite remember.

Anyway, I would assume that the contents may have been a soft drink or cordial.

A lot of food came on stone jars and pots. I lived in South Derbyshire once, and the locals used to tell me about working at the ‘jam pot’ factory. The jam pots were of course earthenware pots.
 

Heartland

master brummie
Apart from the collectible value, the Botanical Beer that went into the jars was made from a mixture of herbs and there were Botanical Breweries in Birmingham.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmy
Amazing what you can learn from the threads!

From the top advert about SALM Brewery equipment, and at the bottom that a growler is US informal for beer carrier.
 

Heartland

master brummie
There was a sort of loose alliance at the Botanical Breweries as they also might have dealt in mineral waters and ginger beer.

Regarding T Saxon & Co, they had premises at 123A Balsall Heath Road near the River Rea. George Law Trickett had a brewery located at 62 Goldthorn Hill, in Wolverhampton, whilst Howarth Brothers were Ginger Beer makers at 22 Church Road, Aston.

Other contemporary makers of botanical beers included Alfred Burgess at 42 Butts Road, Walsall, John Thornley & Son, 38 Raliegh Street, Walsall and Thomas Saxon at Sedgley Street, Wolverhampton.

Saxon & Co, in Birmingham, remained in business until 1944. The Birmingham Mail (August 2nd 1944) carried an advert for good stabling, water and gateway entrance to be let. Applications were to be made to Saxon & Co, 123A Balsall Heath Road.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Below is a photo I took around 1970 of the entrance of what was once the Saxon Botanical brewery, through the archway on the left. the house next door had originally been occupied by a stone mason, Richard Folland, who had a workshop at the back before the houses were built. After he left around 1902 there were several occupants for the workshops, but in 1911 Thomas Saxon, who had previously had a botanical brewers in Villiers St, Wolverhampton , moved into part of the workshop, and in by 1920 had taken them over completely. The firm seems to have remained their till the early 1960s.
17A. 123A Balsall heath Road.jpg
 
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