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bomb damage photos

philbee

birmingham born and bred
bomb damage long acre cromton road 29th july 1942.jpgbomb damage long acre nechells 29th july 1942.jpghighgate road bomb damage 29th july 1942.jpgbomb damage highgate road sparkbrook 29th july 1942.jpg

These are four photos that i found on the english heritage site they were taken on 29th july 1942 the first two are of long acre nechells at the junction of long acre/crompton road , the second two are recorded as highgate road sparkbrook looking at the damage the bombing was extensive there is no mention of casualties the second one of long acre says the bomb crater exposed the river below (the rea perhaps?) .
The photos were taken by a James Nelson

Phil
 

Stephen0002002

master brummie
The damage is incredible isnt it. I am so lucky that I didnt have to live through that time. And to think we think todays days are stressfull. Oh my !
 

sistersue61

master brummie
Thanks Phil, will show mom the Highgate Road ones, she was born in that area, in Rose Cottages on Ladypool Road, but had moved to Tyseley, where they also got bombed.
Sue
 

ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
Thanks for those images, Phil.

The damage shown in Long Acre may have have occurred on the night of 9/10th April 1941. I have a bit of information on it here- this covers mainly the damage to the Newton factory around the corner in Thimble Mill Lane and includes a first-hand reminiscence from someone who survived that night as a young child in Long Acre. Associated website pages deal with more about the blitz in Nechells.

Chris
 

sistersue61

master brummie
Chris, that is a great link thanks for posting it. I can remember the Newton works bus running from Tamworth, one of the shifts must have been shortly after school finishing time, as it used to go when we were waiting for the bus home, on wet days we used to moan about the fact that it was empty and could have taken us as it went the same way!
Sue
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
thanks for posting those pics phil..i will have to get me map out later as my sister lives on the corner of holborn hill and longacre..will see if i can work out where she lives in relation to the pic...

cheers...

lyn
 

carolina

master brummie
Here are a couple more.

1st is Corner of Highgate Road and Queen Street
2nd is Argyle Street, Nechells

Highgate Road and Queen Street 1940.jpgArgyle Street Nechells.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

philbee

birmingham born and bred
Carolina

Looking at the argyle street one it is just down from the long acre/ crompton road photo that i posted the area looks as though it was severely damaged by the bombing , as i have mentioned on the swanhurst school thread i had a relative that was killed in the 9th/10th april 1941 i should imagine this was possibly the same air raid.
A story that was told in our house was that a bomb hit the gas holder at nechells bounced off it and hit nearby houses i dont know if this is true , but dangerous and worrying times.
phil
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
thanks for the pics phil and carolina...i was in arygle st last week...seeing it as it is now who would have thought that such devastation was caused there during the war..looking at that pic i thought there must have been folk who lost lives but ive just looked on the BARRA site and according to that thankfully there was only on person injured at number 44..

lyn
 

paul stacey

master brummie
Thanks for this thread, I remember mom and dad telling me about the horror and damage, but these photo's really bring it home. I think the one with the damaged "Anderson Shelter" in the fore ground is the most poignant one.
paul
 

sistersue61

master brummie
Paul I agree with you there - one of nans friends was badly injured when a bomb fell on the garden and part of their Anderson shelter, their house was untouched and her dad apparently never forgave himself for making the family go into the shelter a place of safety.
Sue
 

paul stacey

master brummie
I too, was told similar stories Sue, especially the one, I think it was Lozells, where a land mine killed all in the Public shelter, some 90 people I believe, very tragic.
paul
 

Stephen0002002

master brummie
Qu. Generally, was the Anderson shelter the safest place to be ? providing there wasn't a direct hit ?

I noticed 1 or 2 Anderson shelters were left in gardens down our road but not all houses seemed to have them.
But maybe they had been taken down by the time I was born (mid 50's). So just wondering if everyone had 1 ?
 

A Sparks

master brummie
My grandmother built the air raid shelter in her garden but I don't know if it was an Anderson type.
She had her elderly father living with her during the war but he refused to go in there - said he would rather die in his own bed!
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
channell 4 did a program a while ago where a street of houses was built like those around in 1940, and bombs were set off nearby to see the effect. As I remember it remember that they studied the effect, using instruments and some models , and concluded that for those in the shelter (I think it was an Anderson) might well of died from having air sucked out of their lungs, even without a direct hit. Someone more knowledgable please correct me if I'm wrong. My grandfather had an Anderson shelter. I don't remember it, but do remember that after the war the corrugated iron was used for other purposes around the garden. I think many will have been dismantled , and so Stephen's missing ones may have been also
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
At the age of five I spent many a night in next door's Anderson Shelter. I remember candles, musty dampness, listening to the drone of bombers above, the explosions of bombs, and the AA guns firing in the nearby park. One night, my sister and me for some reason slept in the house under the pantry slab, and a bomb dropped on us. I remember the neighbour dragging us out, running up to the shelter, my sister under one arm, me under the other, my sister carried facing backward saw the flames, me facing forward did not as we were rushed into the Anderson.
Our neighbours used their Andersons as garden sheds after the war as can be seen in photos below....a link to other glimpses of Andersons click here
 

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