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Birmingham corporation transport

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Hi GReece,

Welcome to the Forum. It would help if you could give us an indication of the years he was there, and whether he was traffic staff, engineering, etc.

Maurice :cool:
 

Lloyd

master brummie
I know (knew?) Barry quite well, he is (was?) an avid bus enthusiast and involved a bit in the bus preservation world.
 

aston lad

master brummie
I worked with Barry in Tyburn Road, until we were moved out in 1991ish, a very humble person knew quite a bit about buses and aeroplanes....
 

NoddKD

master brummie
Just been looking on another Birmingham website and spotted a very strange looking bus.
It's make is AEC with a depot?number 93. Destination board shows 1A,can't make out the rest
Registration AHX 63.
In the picture it appears very narrow and has the boarding platform at the front.
The photograph was taken at Five Ways,no date.
Anyone any ideas?

NoddKD being curious.
 

Lloyd

master brummie
Just been looking on another Birmingham website and spotted a very strange looking bus.
It's make is AEC with a depot?number 93. Destination board shows 1A,can't make out the rest
Registration AHX 63.
In the picture it appears very narrow and has the boarding platform at the front.
The photograph was taken at Five Ways,no date.
Anyone any ideas?

NoddKD being curious.
The AEC 'Q' type, whose engine was behind the front offside wheel and also had a set-back front axle allowing the entrance to be forward of it, opposite the driver's cab. Designed by George Rackham, who although English had worked for the American firm 'Yellow Coach' from 1922 to 1926, this American inspired vehicle was in production from 1932 to 1937. It's individuality did not bring enthusiasm from the bus industry, most being single deckers bodied as coaches supplied mainly in ones and twos to private companies - double deckers suffered similar caution from buyers although London Transport had about 200 of them, mostly single deckers with forward entrances for central area routes or central entranced for country area operation. There were a few double deckers constructed as electric trolleybuses, most of which were built for the Australian market. The Birmingham one was tried as a demonstration vehicle, running from Acocks Green garage mainly on the 1 or 1A route, it returned to AEC and was fitted with a diesel engine (it had previously been petrol driven), was purchased by the corporation and ran from Harborne garage, which at the time was the only depot with diesel fuel facilities. During WW2 it was sold at the requirement of the Board of Trade (acting as the Ministry of Transport at the time) to private operator Yeomans, of Canon Pyon, Herefordshire, who also were 'allocated' AEC Q 'deckers from other municipalities as well, presumably for government contracts taking workers to various RAF aifields under construction in Herefordshire at the time. Finally, having donated its engine to another one in Yeoman's fleet, it ended its days as a storeshed in Yeoman's yard, and later on a nearby farm. Seen below 1) in London, brand new in it's original silver livery: 2)In Birmingham carrying an experimental livery using more blue than cream: 3) In Hereford Bus Station while with Yeoman's.

761 001  1932-london.jpg93  AHX 63  AEC Q.JPG93  AHX 63  with Yeoman's. OG 371 in front..jpg
 

NoddKD

master brummie
The AEC 'Q' type, whose engine was behind the front offside wheel and also had a set-back front axle allowing the entrance to be forward of it, opposite the driver's cab. Designed by George Rackham, who although English had worked for the American firm 'Yellow Coach' from 1922 to 1926, this American inspired vehicle was in production from 1932 to 1937. It's individuality did not bring enthusiasm from the bus industry, most being single deckers bodied as coaches supplied mainly in ones and twos to private companies - double deckers suffered similar caution from buyers although London Transport had about 200 of them, mostly single deckers with forward entrances for central area routes or central entranced for country area operation. There were a few double deckers constructed as electric trolleybuses, most of which were built for the Australian market. The Birmingham one was tried as a demonstration vehicle, running from Acocks Green garage mainly on the 1 or 1A route, it returned to AEC and was fitted with a diesel engine (it had previously been petrol driven), was purchased by the corporation and ran from Harborne garage, which at the time was the only depot with diesel fuel facilities. During WW2 it was sold at the requirement of the Board of Trade (acting as the Ministry of Transport at the time) to private operator Yeomans, of Canon Pyon, Herefordshire, who also were 'allocated' AEC Q 'deckers from other municipalities as well, presumably for government contracts taking workers to various RAF aifields under construction in Herefordshire at the time. Finally, having donated its engine to another one in Yeoman's fleet, it ended its days as a storeshed in Yeoman's yard, and later on a nearby farm. Seen below 1) in London, brand new in it's original silver livery: 2)In Birmingham carrying an experimental livery using more blue than cream: 3) In Hereford Bus Station while with Yeoman's.

View attachment 155900View attachment 155901View attachment 155902
Hi Lloyd,sorry for the delay in replying. A family funeral and my son's passing out parade took priority I'm afraid.

Thanks for your prompt and comprehensive reply. I am often amazed at the depth of knowledge and subject interest on this site and your reply is very much in keeping with the help available.
Thank you.

NoddKD in admiration.
 

paulinehorton

knowlegable brummie
It would be helpful if you could tell us the:
Make and model.
Year of manufacture
Route(s) it worked
Which garage it was assigned to

Bob
Hello Bob, I have no knowledge of this bus other than the fact that it was refurbished as a Birmingham Co-operative Grocery/Meat vehicle. See attached.
thank you Pauline.
 

Attachments

  • D57011A6-7514-4819-9BAB-CC755110BC28.jpeg
    D57011A6-7514-4819-9BAB-CC755110BC28.jpeg
    298.4 KB · Views: 12

paulinehorton

knowlegable brummie
FOP 468 (1468) was supplied to the BCT by the MofS in 1945. Like all wartime buses, except those concerted to driver training. lasted only until 1951. It was a Daimler with AEC engine and had a Park Royal body.
I attach a picture of this vehicle converted to a Birmingham Co-operative grocery vehicle. I was just looking for a picture before the conversion.
many thanks, Pauline.
 

Attachments

  • AB234223-627D-41E0-A626-7C7F15AE0778.jpeg
    AB234223-627D-41E0-A626-7C7F15AE0778.jpeg
    298.4 KB · Views: 10
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