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Birmingham Corporation bus history

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Figs 21,22,23 & 24


Fig-21.gif


Fig-22.gif


Fig-23.gif


Fig-24.gif
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Bus Route maps, 1923. 1929 and 1939 . the file names have become a bit distorted, but this seems to be right

Map25201.jpg


Map-2_buses_1923-.gif


Map25203.jpg
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
On the table of routes, unfortunately Table 1 ( if there was one) seems to have gone missing, but here are Tables 2,3,4,5 & 6

Table-2_routes.gif


Table-3.gif


Table-4.gif


Table-5.gif


Table-6.gif
 

Lloyd

master brummie
Figs 5,6,7,,9 & 10. Fig 8 has already been posted
Fig-5.gif
This photo, showing the 'skate' arrangement towed in the tram track for the electricity supply negative return, is made absolutely pointless by the 'Posted to' banner. Couldn't it be placed more sympathetically to the object of the photograph?
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I second Lloyd's post. Often the 'posted to' legend obliterates some detail particularly where information about the posted photo, postcard or whatever, is, quite usually, at the bottom of the page.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
The watermarks on the images are unusual and look as if a dark image has been pasted onto the main images. Note the black background is the same in each photo. One thing I do if I don't want the watermark to show is to leave a white border on the bottom of the photo. I did this recently restoring a photo for a forum member.
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
I understand and support the reason for doing this, but is it possible to do it as an embossed watermark?
 

Xpresso

Brummie babby
Can anyone tell me the colour scheme used by Birmingham buses in the early 1930s. Looking at pictures from that time, it appears that rather than the familiar cream and navy, another colour was used for the upper panels, ie beneath the window line. It does look as thought cream or maybe white was used for the roof. Any help much appreciated.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
And also whether the photograph was originally taken on orthochromatic or panchromatic film
 

devonjim

master brummie
On the table of routes, unfortunately Table 1 ( if there was one) seems to have gone missing, but here are Tables 2,3,4,5
Table-3.gif
Table-5.gif
When I read a type set list such as these I take the information as "gospel" BUT in table 5 I trust my memory over the information given for the extension of Route 15B on 29/08/1948 to Sheldon Heath. As a family we moved to Garretts Green on 4th December 1948, our first house, and I have a distinct memory of walking to Bilton Grange to catch the 15B to town for the first few weeks of our time there.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The book by Malcolm Keelley states that the 15B variant of the 15/16 routes. (1958 saw the 17 extension to Meadway with 17J as far as Garretts Green Lane. The original 15B commenced on 23/11/1938. Initially it ran as far as Horrell Road but on 23/1/1949 was it extended to Sheldon Heath Road island. The destination blind usually read Garretts Green Lane 15B.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Many rush hour buses terminated short of what was called the city loop - I believe this started in the late 1950's and existed into the mid 1950's (maybe later). Some buses bore the destination MOAT ROW, others ETHEL STREET. This saved a journey around the city loop and ensured an empty bus as it commenced its return to the suburbs. The buses often filled up when travelling the loop. Another variant was the 29/29A services which curtailed the long cross city journey only going as far as the the loop. The blind simply read CITY. Fortunately the citizens of Brum were familiar with these arrangements, visitors less so. Despite the highways department causing a few headaches for the BCT it was nothing compared to the forthcoming deviations as new roads were carved through once densely populated areas. I believe the early days of the PTE was a passengers nightmare when operational matters were more important than passenger needs.
I was not there to witness it so can only accept what many relate.
 

Gerry Cannell

master brummie
Just an aside really, but when I went back on the buses in 1976, I was based at Sutton garage, with the Midland Red, and was driving all BMMO buses. Then, when we were taken over by WMPTE, we had an influx of veri slow, and tatty Metro Cammell buses, which, after driving D.9 and the Volvo ailsa turbo, came as a bit of a shock to the system. The Fleetline (I think it was) was an awful flat motored bus, no power at all, and I remember being late on almost all my runs. Sorry if I went of subject there....
 

Dave C

master brummie
My Great Uncle was a motor bus driver in 1930 operating from the Arthur Street depot otherwise known as Coventry Road. Does anyone know what he would have been driving, ie a tram or a bus and are there any photos of the depot from that period - I can't find any!
 

Lloyd

master brummie
This view is the roadway outside Arthur Street depot - rails in the foreground turn into the depot. Trams for the Bordesley routes and the Trolleybuses for Coventry Road were garaged here. This post war view was taken on the occasion of an enthusiasts' tour on the front tram, 522, no doubt travelling routes soon to close.
 

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