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Birmingham Christmas of the past

Richard Dye

master brummie
Hi.Viv i had one of them pull down.it was a bit iffy i pulled it down once and it come down on my head.
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.so i took it down and have now got a step ladder that can be used as a conventional ladder as well. when not in use it goes in the shed.

We did pretty much the same as Pete. We bought a new light weight folding ladder on sale. I watched a house inspector who was over 350 pounds go up the “fold down” I had to look the other way as the fold down bent and creaked. And guess what because it’s easy to carry (has a safe handle) and is light weight we use it safely(at least so far after 5 years). Merry Christmas!
 

mw0njm.

brummie dude
We did pretty much the same as Pete. We bought a new light weight folding ladder on sale. I watched a house inspector who was over 350 pounds go up the “fold down” I had to look the other way as the fold down bent and creaked. And guess what because it’s easy to carry (has a safe handle) and is light weight we use it safely(at least so far after 5 years). Merry Christmas!
i have had mine now for ten years. the old loft ladder was just too much hastle the cover coming down.:mad: now it opens into the loft out the way with out having to wear a
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just in case
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
As we have very young grandchildren we wondered if we’d need to review the Christmas tree decorations in case any were unsafe/unsuitable. I’m pretty sure most are ok (although we’re still putting off going in the loft). But we’ll keep our eye on the children just in case.

Anyway this all started me off thinking about having a child safe tree. So I bought one of those felt trees with felt baubles fixed with Velcro. They can move the baubles to different positions on the tree. So we’ve proudly hung it up. However our 2 year old grand daughter doesn’t seem to be too interested so far. Oh well seemed like a good idea at the time. In any case not all is lost as I’ve enjoyed ringing the changes with the felt baubles !

This all reminds me of one Christmas many years ago when we left our Jack Russell alone while we went out for a few hours. On return (and as usual frantically greeted by the dog) her mouth was smeared bright red all around. Well my first reaction was “she’s killed something!!”. But on going into the living room we could see she’d had a whale of a time chomping on the fake red polystyrene apples from the tree. Can’t imagine they were too tasty ...... errrr

Viv.
 

Time Traveller 66

master brummie
Been up the loft on my none health and safety step ladders all decorations and tree down intact. Had a couple of close shaves over the years even the dog keeps out of the way . They seem to have a sixth sense and know when an adult may plummet from the sky or loft hatch onto them. Be careful up and down those steps everyone.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
10613648-F356-4F34-B5EF-6A0335D113C1.jpeg
Source: British Newspaper Archive

This Birmingham Post 1970s comparison of Christmas food costs got me thinking. Look how little prices changed over one year and yet it’s entitied “A Dearer Christmas”. It's also striking that some items on this list would have been unimaginable 20 years before.

Isn’t an “oven ready” turkey the same as a fresh turkey ? The listing of some items like mince pies, Christmas Cake and Christmas puddings suggests to me a general move away from making your own. I know my mum bought at this time rather than made them at home. I expect they were competitive in price too compared with buying all the ingredients to make your own.

I like that the journalist included a tin of Alka Selzer on the list ! A clear indicator that most people could expect to suffer the effects of over indulgence. Remember those little tins where you inserted the spoon handle and twist to open ?

Viv.
 
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Richard Dye

master brummie
Been up the loft on my none health and safety step ladders all decorations and tree down intact. Had a couple of close shaves over the years even the dog keeps out of the way . They seem to have a sixth sense and know when an adult may plummet from the sky or loft hatch onto them. Be careful up and down those steps everyone.
Be careful TT! You are pushing the envelope as they say……
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
View attachment 164586

This Birmingham Post 1970s comparison of Christmas food costs got me thinking. Look how little prices changed over one year and yet it’s entitied “A Dearer Christmas”. It's also striking that some items on this list would have been unimaginable 20 years before.

Isn’t an “oven ready” turkey the same as a fresh turkey ? The listing of some items like mince pies, Christmas Cake and Christmas puddings suggests to me a general move away from making your own. I know my mum bought at this time rather than made them at home. I expect they were competitive in price too compared with buying all the ingredients to make your own.

I like that the journalist included a tin of Alka Selzer on the list ! A clear indicator that most people could expect to suffer the effects of over indulgence. Remember those little tins where you inserted the spoon handle and twist to open ?

Viv.
Fresh turkey-unplucked etc, oven ready - stuff it and shove it in the oven. It would be interesting to compare those prices with todays, was thar click and collect or delivered?
Bob
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Something that isn’t listed is a joint of ham. Always thought that was a traditional Christmas treat, but maybe not.

And only walnuts and Brazil nuts are mentioned. As far back as I can remember we always had hazelnuts too. Loved the glossy brown shells. Viv.
 
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Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
Something that isn’t listed is a joint if ham. Always thought that was a traditional Christmas treat, but maybe not.

And only walnuts and Brazil nuts are mentioned. As far back as I can remember we always had hazelnuts too. Loved the glossy brown shells. Viv.
no joint of ham for us viv dad always got our turkey on christmas eve as they were sold off a little bit cheaper however we always had brazil and walnuts...a box of dates and a box of orange and lemon slices with sugar on which i still buy now mom was never a big drinker but dad always managed to get her a bottle of apricot wine which lasted until dads birthday on 1st of jan....happy days:)

lyn
 

mw0njm.

brummie dude
no joint of ham for us viv dad always got our turkey on christmas eve as they were sold off a little bit cheaper however we always had brazil and walnuts...a box of dates and a box of orange and lemon slices with sugar on which i still buy now mom was never a big drinker but dad always managed to get her a bottle of apricot wine which lasted until dads birthday on 1st of jan....happy days:)

lyn
we had them every year:grinning:
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Oh yes the sugar coated fruit jellies ! Because mum worked in various local shops customers always bought her gifts, often a bottle of something alcoholic, chocolate liqueurs , fruit jellies, marzipan fruits, that sort of thing. They became a good follow up to the regular box of Roses or Quality Street, I clearly remember mum coming home with bags of gifts she’d been given. Don’t see it so much today.

I expect we got used to having ham as she worked for Bywaters for a while. Must have kept it going when she left. Remember the smell of it boiling in spices and mustard. Then in the oven to finish it off. I also remember mum telling me her mum used to cure hams in her cellar, one being kept for Christmas. So that could be why she cooked ham for us at Christmas - keeping up her family tradition, but modified as we never had a cellar.

I also notice no chocolate logs on the 1970s list. Again we had them quite often as mum ran a bread shop. We always took it for granted we’d have this as mum had her network of shop contacts and grateful customers. Viv.

Viv.
 
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