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Birmingham buses

Lloyd

master brummie
Can anyone tell me did bct buses have engine mountings or was the engine rigid to the chassis?
From the late 1920s engines had some form of flexibility in their mountings, more to reduce the shocks from road bumps risking cracking engine castings than anything else. It was soon noticed that flexibly mounting engines reduced the vibration of engines passing to the chassis and therefore being heard and felt by passengers, particularly with diesel engines, so the amount of flexibility was increased.
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
From the late 1920s engines had some form of flexibility in their mountings, more to reduce the shocks from road bumps risking cracking engine castings than anything else. It was soon noticed that flexibly mounting engines reduced the vibration of engines passing to the chassis and therefore being heard and felt by passengers, particularly with diesel engines, so the amount of flexibility was increased.
thanks Lloyd.i was reading that early buses justs had engine pads....and they increased the flywheel size. there must have been loads of vibration...
 

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
I see in both posts the tickets have a number in fact the first post the tickets have a real serious code
So was counterfeit tickets real or just a threat ?.
The idea of trying to punt off fake bus tickets seems unlikely ?
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I think the 10d and 11d Workmen's tickets I showed have had the prefix codes hidden for the photo. Most tickets have code letters and numbers which had to be recorded at the start and end of shifts or days. That ensured all monies corresponded with their issue. The details were recorded on waybills (BCT), railways had other methods. Fraud is not only a passenger pastime, staff are also capable of it. It many stores cameras are close to checkouts/tills. They watch the staff as much as the customer. 19/11d and 99p. were often a good way of making sure money went into tills and not pockets as the till had to be opened to give change. It also looks cheaper than 20/- or £1. ;)
 

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
I think the 10d and 11d Workmen's tickets I showed have had the prefix codes hidden for the photo. Most tickets have code letters and numbers which had to be recorded at the start and end of shifts or days. That ensured all monies corresponded with their issue. The details were recorded on waybills (BCT), railways had other methods. Fraud is not only a passenger pastime, staff are also capable of it. It many stores cameras are close to checkouts/tills. They watch the staff as much as the customer. 19/11d and 99p. were often a good way of making sure money went into tills and not pockets as the till had to be opened to give change. It also looks cheaper than 20/- or £1. ;)
After my post I got to thinking the ticket codes were in fact to check on employee theft or at least a attempt to keep them honest ?,
So now I wonder if they used ticket sales to gather information as to how many buses to run and at what times ?.
So easy to do these days but back in the day did they ask the clippy's if they thought the #11 route needed a extra bus on Friday at quiting time ?.
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
After my post I got to thinking the ticket codes were in fact to check on employee theft or at least a attempt to keep them honest ?,
So now I wonder if they used ticket sales to gather information as to how many buses to run and at what times ?.
So easy to do these days but back in the day did they ask the clippy's if they thought the #11 route needed a extra bus on Friday at quiting time ?.

The conductors waybills would show the ticket numbers at each terminus and at designated stage points en route so a study of the waybills would show number of passengers boarding at the various points. This would give an indication of the patronage of the bus route at various times of the day.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
A study of the introduction dates of routes, initially tram and later buses, show the development of the city. I am sure this information is on BHF, probably in the Peter Walker archive.
 

nickcc101

master brummie
Some Drivers I've worked with have tried all the tricks in the book and that was only a few years ago. Taking fares and not issuing tickets, giving out children's tickets instead of adults and even issuing 50p dog tickets. This was in the days before cctv and satellite monitoring and only one inspector to cover the whole of Cornwall. How many passengers even look at their ticket and once they've got off the bus the Drivers in the clear. Obviously not worth the risk with returns as the return driver may check the ticket when you attempt to board.
 

Richarddye

master brummie
thanks Lloyd.i was reading that early buses justs had engine pads....and they increased the flywheel size. there must have been loads of vibration...
9
mwOnjm, the early engine pads were basically solid rubber (natural) as there really was not any synthetic materials. The solid material really got pounded when big engines were started, particularly diesels with high compression. Eventually the mounts were converted to a form of hydraulic support and absorber.
 
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