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Birmingham and the Arts and Craft Movement

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
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There must be many associations with Birmingham and the Arts and Craft Movements. Here is an article from the Illustrated London News of October 1974.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Florence Camm (1874-1960).

In the book Birmingham: The Workshop of the World, (edited by Carl Chinn and Malclom Dick) it gives a brief mention of the remarkable Florence Camm in the section Art, Design and Architecture.

Florence and her brothers took over their father’s firm, Thomas Camm Ltd, on his death in 1912. Her stained glass designs can be seen in many local churches and buildings and also worldwide. There is a good description of here life on Wikipedia...
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Camm

And here is an obituary from the Birmingham Daily Post.
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At the Royal Academy in 1909 it was said, "Though most of the designs for stained glass are particularly poor, the originality and beauty of those by Miss Florence Camm and Mr WH Camm are not merely noteworthy by contrast. They are intrinsically beautiful little drawings of two scholarly artists whose names are new to us."

In 1926 the firm completed 9 windows for St John's Episcopal Church, Long Island. Ralph Adams Cram, America's chief ecclesiastical architect said, "they are indeed almost a new art in that they possess certain qualities of personality, subtlety, and equisite craftsmanship that have no parallel in the past."

Walter Camm said "Britain now leads the world in this delicate craft, some of the modern work being at least equal to the best art of the 13/14C, when the old craftsmen attained their greatest skill.” He added that studies for the figures in windows made by the firm were always taken from life. “It is surprising the number of noble faces there are about, whenever I pass a likely model in the street I stop him, and if possible induce him to pose for us.”

Here is a picture from 1954 still working when she was 80 years Old.

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