• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Beggars Bush

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
I don't think this will fool anybody for long, but it's only a bit of fun to get the old grey matter active.

Phil
 

Attachments

  • where.jpg
    where.jpg
    139.4 KB · Views: 8

G G Jean

Brummy Wench.
Neither have I Ann but would love to know what the man's thinking????. Mind you could it be the mount Kingstanding?. Jean.
 
A

Ann B

Guest
Jean,
He's thinking 'How strange, in a 100 years time people will be trying to guess where I am.'

Ann
 

G G Jean

Brummy Wench.
Are you serious Lloyd?. Oh I get it now. A bit slow this morning I'm afraid. Who is Teresa Green?. I realy must be slow today. Jean.
 
Last edited:

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
col h

Well done, its The Beggars Bush in a much changed surroundings. As these photos begin to show, but even they do not indicate just how busy it is today. I dont think our friend would be sitting in that same spot today for long.

There is a local legend that tells of a beggar buried at the junction of the Chester Road and Jockey Road there was a hawthorn bush on the Chester Road here before the 1930s which local people called the Beggar's Bush and was always believed to be the bush under which the beggar had died. As the bush also marked the parish boundary between Aldridge, Perry and Sutton Coldfied, no-one could agree who should pay for the burial and so he was buried where he lay.

Phil
 

Attachments

  • Erdington  Beggars Bush 1.jpg
    Erdington Beggars Bush 1.jpg
    114.3 KB · Views: 7
  • Erdington  Beggars Bush 2.jpg
    Erdington Beggars Bush 2.jpg
    109.8 KB · Views: 7
  • Erdington Beggars Bush 3.jpg
    Erdington Beggars Bush 3.jpg
    98 KB · Views: 7

G G Jean

Brummy Wench.
Phyl that is interesting as we were there on Wednesday for a swift pint. My brother in law lives just over the road from there and he would be interested in what you have to say. Jean.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
There was a place named Beggars Bush in the early 1800s. Many will know it because of the inn of this name. A discussion arose on this forum from the postcard below titled "The Beggars Bush, Erdington". The following posts records that discussion.


Think this one's debatable. It's labelled the Beggars Bush 'Erdington' . Was it Erdington at this time? (The ladies in the image look Edwardian). Viv.

image.jpeg
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Thanks all. So it was simply on the Erdington border. That's a very comprehensive account Alan in your link #670. Thanks. Viv.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
IMG_1717.jpg
The Post in "Old street pics" mentioned above leaves a few unanswered questions and as more information becomes freely available maybe some light can be shed.

The Birmingham Gazette prints the proposed Inclosure of Lands within the Royal Town, Manor, and Lordship of Sutton Coldfield, in the county of Warwick in January 1827.

On Coldfield Common...the "Setting up of carriage roads and highways"....one of the roads...

Number 4...A Road of 40 ft commencing at a certain bush called Beggars' Bush, near the said turnpike Road, and extending in an eastward direction over the said common, and terminating at the Horse and Jockey Public House. (Jockey Road?)

No 2...a road of 40ft commencing at the east end of the road in the hamlet of Erdington, called Gravelly-lane Road, and extending in an eastwardly direction over part of the said common into the said turnpike road.

The thumbnail OS Map, for around 1882, shows the boundary between Staffs and Warks more or less along the Chester Road and the Beggars' Bush tree is on the boundary. The hamlet of Erdington is quite a distance away and I can't find any evidence that it was once in Staffs, and is hardly ever mentioned in connection with the Bush.

The map also gives the name of the pub as the Bush, but in all references I can find from 1858 through to 1939 it is referred to as The Beggars Bush with or without the apostrophe in both places! The Inclosure shows the apostrophe after the "s."

The advert for the sale of the Beggars' Bush in 1884 states the inclusion of stabling and a Coach-house.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Three map references between 1834 - 1909 show

1834 - labelled as "Beggars Bush" - no 'Inn' or 'Tavern'. So presume it was a place not an inn at that time. The early 'Beggars Bush' tavern/inn was supposed to be nearby but can't see anything marked on the 1834 map.
1895 - labelled simply but clearly as "Inn". No mention of Beggars Bush (as a place) Why?
1909 - the 1895 map was updated in 1906 and published in 1909. Again it simply but clearly labelled an "Inn". No mention of Beggars Bush as a place either. Why?

Maps posted below.

Viv.
 

Attachments

  • image.jpeg
    image.jpeg
    285.3 KB · Views: 28
  • image.jpeg
    image.jpeg
    224.4 KB · Views: 26
  • image.jpeg
    image.jpeg
    244.3 KB · Views: 26

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Three map references between 1834 - 1909 show

1834 - labelled as "Beggars Bush" - no 'Inn' or 'Tavern'. So presume it was a place not an inn at that time. The early 'Beggars Bush' tavern/inn was supposed to be nearby but can't see anything marked on the 1834 map.
1895 - labelled simply but clearly as "Inn". No mention of Beggars Bush (as a place) Why?
1909 - the 1895 map was updated in 1906 and published in 1909. Again it simply but clearly labelled an "Inn". No mention of Beggars Bush as a place either. Why?

Maps posted below.

Viv.

On the first map marked 1834, and just below the Beggars' Bush, there is a Jordan's Grave mentioned. No.5 road on the Inclosure reads...

Width 30ft commencing near a certain place called Jordan's Grave, at the road that separates the hamlet of Erdington from the manor of Perry Barr, and extending in a north easterly direction to the said turnpike road, continuing in the same direction from the said turnpike road, and terminating in the last described road. (No.4 Jockey Road?)

By 1881 Jordan's Grave has disappeared under the St Mary RC College.

The Inn was not built until 1841, and so the Beggars' Bush on the 1834 would describe a place, and there is the first mention of Erdington!
 
Top