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Battle Of The Somme 1 July Centenary

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Today is 100 years since the start of the Battle of the Somme. Let's remember those who fought for us. Tell us about your ancestors who fought. Viv.

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Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Captain Arthur Brooke Turner, a Birmingham solicitor, was injured on the first day of the Somme. His uniform is on display at Blakesley Hall, along with other artifacts and film screenings. Viv.

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ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
Remembering three Old Veseyans/Suttonians who lost their lives on this day:

2/Lt. George Russell Courtney Martin (aged 24), 1/6th Warks, of Hartopp Court.
2/Lt. Sidney Joseph Winkley (20) 1/6th Warks, of Hartopp Road.
2/Lt. Stanley John Ellison (19), 1st/5th S. Staffs of "Wyndhurst", Driffold.

At least 12 more would follow them over the coming weeks in the same battle.

(Source: "Pro Patria Mori", 1999, by Dave Phillips)

Chris
 

guilbert53

master brummie
Today is 100 years since the start of the Battle of the Somme. Let's remember those who fought for us.
While it is right we remember those who fought for us I cant hep but get angry at the total waste of human life caused by the various generals and leaders from around Europe at the time.

The scale of death and injury suffered by those at the Somme (and other WW1 battles) should have made the generals and leaders hang their head in shame and aim for peace as soon as possible.

But they did not, and the war carried on for a couple more years.

I recently read a book about WW1 and it covers the Battle of Verdun, which was the Germans fighting to capture Verdun from the French. As this did not involve the British it is less well known by British people.

The Battle of Verdun lasted from February to December 1916 and it is estimated there was about 1 million casualties with about 300,000 killed (estimates vary).

And with all that loss of life the Germans never took Verdun.

Sorry, not wishing to take anything away from the Somme, but sadly this sort of carnage was going on all over the Western Front in WW1.

Such a tragic waste.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Absolutely guilbert. The numbers are almost unimaginable. And battles didn't come to an end very quickly either, dragging on and on, sometimes to achieve what seems so little (in terms of ground gained etc.). I have gone over many hundreds of WW1 records and war diaries and the loss and suffering is heartbreaking. The sacrifice made should never be forgotten. The least we can do is pay tribute to those as each anniversary emerges so that our successors follow us in remembering them too. Viv.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
my rellie...

HARRY FROGETT
BORN HOCKLEY
RESIDENCE ASTON

KINGS ROYAL RIFLE CORPS..BATTALION 16..KIA AT THE SOMME 6TH NOV 1916..AGE 21 JUST A FEW MONTHS AFTER GETTING MARRIED...ON THE ROLL OF HONOUR AT WINCHESTER CATHEDRAL ALSO HONOURED ON THE THIEPVAL MEMORIAL..

GOD BLESS THEM ALL..

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Simon4130

master brummie
My Great Grandmother had 6 brothers and 4 of them lost their lives in the First World War, i'm currently researching them but unfortunately its such a common surname that the results are going to take a lot of weeding out, not helped by the fact that i'm not sure yet which four perished. Its probable that some of them fought and maybe died at the Somme.

Here at the library I organised a small display of related books to be put out in the foyer to mark the centenary.

Simon
 

john knight

signman
My Great Grandmother had 6 brothers and 4 of them lost their lives in the First World War, i'm currently researching them but unfortunately its such a common surname that the results are going to take a lot of weeding out, not helped by the fact that i'm not sure yet which four perished. Its probable that some of them fought and maybe died at the Somme.

Here at the library I organised a small display of related books to be put out in the foyer to mark the centenary.

Simon
Simon I have a book with a huge amount of names in, what name are you looking for.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
My Great Grandmother had 6 brothers and 4 of them lost their lives in the First World War, i'm currently researching them but unfortunately its such a common surname that the results are going to take a lot of weeding out, not helped by the fact that i'm not sure yet which four perished. Its probable that some of them fought and maybe died at the Somme.

Here at the library I organised a small display of related books to be put out in the foyer to mark the centenary.

Simon
hi simon such a massive loss for just one family....good luck with your research hope you find what you are looking for

lyn
 

allanbrum

Life long Brummie
I would like to record and remember MAJOR ALFRED ARMSTRONG CADDICK, 8th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment who died aged 44 on this day 100 years ago, 1st July 1916. He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial. He had been on active service since the outbreak of the war serving in France since April 1915. He had two brothers who were also serving in different areas at the same time. They achieved what was probably a unique distinction in that all three were mentioned for "Distinguished Conduct" in the same dispatch in January 1916. In civilian life he was in practice as a solicitor and Deputy Town Clerk of West Bromwich. He was a member of Sandwell Park Golf Club who lost five other members in the conflict, Lieut. R. STANDEFORD PULLEN, Lieut. H.G.NEVILLE, Capt. G.F.SILVESTER, Lieut.R.MAXWELL TRIMBLE, and the club professional, Cpl. J.E.EDWARDS.
 
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