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Autumn in the Garden

Nico

master brummie
Big flock of long tailed tits today about 20 queueing for the nuts but they couldn't work out how to use the sunflower heart feeder which is a clear tube with a hole each side and a perch. Inside a wire mesh squirrel preventer. Unless they don't want them. None of the birds are unless I put them in the open little house feeder.
We have a new young cat visiting he leaps about 6 feet to try and get the birds on the nuts. also a young crow who is trying to oust the magpies.The usual tom caught one of the mice. A dead wood pigeon not a mark on it that's the second one. They must die though. Lots of toadstools again orange in huge clusters round the base of the birch tree. Which I think is on its way out. I got stuck in the laurel high pruning, left my hat in there! Saw Barmy's rubbish protruding through by about a foot in places. Tried to shift it but I can't. Too heavy. While he is away. Also saw a pigeon nest and parents feeding one.He can fly though. Very late. Maybe they copy the feral ones. Transplanted nasturtiums evening primrose and golden rod. Anything to hide his horrible fence. To the person whose dog eats fuschias. Nan's dog dug up her potatoes and ate them, and he was partial to lobelia and nutty slack and old sawn wood. He had bones to chew on though!
 

Alberta

Super Moderator
Staff member
Possibly the last mowing has been done but next year beware the strimmer,
Many years ago I strimmed without wearing goggles and ended up in A & E.
Yesterday Steve was in the hall when a stone. courtesy of the council strimmer, flew from across the road and my front garden shattering my porch window with a loud bang.Thank goodness no one was walking past.
The bloke was wearing ear defenders and quite oblivious to what had happened.
The firm have accepted liability and will pay for double glazed unit but the bang was a bit of a shock although the shattered window is very pretty, lol.
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
Possibly the last mowing has been done but next year beware the strimmer,
Many years ago I strimmed without wearing goggles and ended up in A & E.
Yesterday Steve was in the hall when a stone. courtesy of the council strimmer, flew from across the road and my front garden shattering my porch window with a loud bang.Thank goodness no one was walking past.
The bloke was wearing ear defenders and quite oblivious to what had happened.
The firm have accepted liability and will pay for double glazed unit but the bang was a bit of a shock although the shattered window is very pretty, lol.
Hi.Alberta,
I did that last year. strimmed the weeds and got my face covered and eyes full of knotweed liquid. it was a hospial job to wash me down. i was coverd in blisters and burns from the stuff. now i steer clear of it. and wear a full face mask.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Hoping to get another mow in this year, but it’s so wet here.

Bought two Cannas this year. Where and how do you store them ? Viv.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
did our last cut last week and i am still trying to get a tray of 24 pansies in but either the weather has been too bad or i have been busy decorating the living room :rolleyes:
 

Nico

master brummie
Took all the pot saucers out as all the pots are sodden. Lots of little worms underneath and slugs still. I cleaned the saucers with the watering can a bit and the pots, we have tarmac and gravel and moss and they get very splashed. Managed to propogate the musk mallow (and discover it's name at last) this year so that it flowers. One has self seeded/rooted in the moss on the yard as has a snapdragon so I will leave them in. The hollyhocks have done this also and Esthereeds wild sweet peas and nasturtiums and wall flower, fox and cubs, you name it. The robin usually appears from behind a pot,'he' appears everywhere! Not so many song birds as there is a young crow about perching far too low and a magpie comes on the bird feeder. The big flock of long tailed tits ignored them maybe they feel safe together.I pulled out some dead nasturtium stalks they are like rope. Amazingly strong. The birds often take them for nesting. We have a glut of acorns everywhere, crunch crunch. Also disposed of the collection of varied coloured disposable gloves people have thrown in, some I know where from, have found their way back home.
 
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sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Canna Lilies - they spread like wildfire. Ours are in a huge pot and filled it in no time at all. A lot of trimming to do in the winter if in a pot, because all the leaves die off, and not an awful lot of flowers. I was hoping it would die, but those things are survivors!

Maurice :cool:
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
Canna Lilies - they spread like wildfire. Ours are in a huge pot and filled it in no time at all. A lot of trimming to do in the winter if in a pot, because all the leaves die off, and not an awful lot of flowers. I was hoping it would die, but those things are survivors!

Maurice :cool:
be careful with that strimmer our Maurice:worried: the only thing i can plant in my carden at the moment is rice,it flooded.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
I've finished any strimming now until the Spring, Pete. We had quite a bit of rain a week ago and now it's got the whole winter to become a jungle again. Then my mate Zac will plough it all in about April and the whole scenario starts again! :)
Far too many big stones to rotivate it - the last guy to try that damaged his rotivator.

Maurice :cool:
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Just been dodging rain showers to get into the garden to refix plants that have broken loose from their moorings. We’ve had so much wind (and rain) over the last couple of weeks that a lot of plants have wriggled loose. Anything that isn’t tied down, has moved to a different position.

So a bit of a tidy up was called for. While tying in a young jasmine back along the fence, my next door neighbour’s new cabin office caught my eye. Lovely thing with, I think, cedar cladding. And there’s my hard-working neighbour beavering away at his screen on Zoom to various countries across the world. But what else caught my eye is that my neighbour’s computer screen is facing outwards. So all my mooching about around that part of the garden is providing my neighbour’s audience with an interesting English Country garden background staring an English country lady doing her stuff too !

The garden office has landed. Expect we’ll see more and more of this as people think about working long-term from home. Must say, I’d have much preferred sitting in my garden to work than all those years of trailing up to Westminster to do my job. Would have been a lot, lot happier too.

Viv.
 
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