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Aston Pictures

aston lad

master brummie
Does anyone know when they replaced both bridges across Aston Hall Road (pic 482) ?.....I am sure as a child in the 1950's I walked under those bridges as they were then...
 

David Weaver

gone but not forgotten
Thanks for the photo Stitcher, it was taken the year I was born. That was my playground and used to love standing under the bridges and listen to the rumble of the trains. Then I'd cut through lover's walk to see if my dad went past on his coal lorry. Regards David.
 
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Stitcher

Guest
If other members enjoy looking at the pictures I post, that is all the encouragement I need to carry on but we must all remember that my collection will run dry one day. That means we should all keep our eyes open for images from the past so we can carry on indefinately.
 

BazzM

master brummie
Stitcher, you keep posting them as long as you can. Whether they have appeared before, or not, they are still worth viewing. I love old pictures of Brum.
 

Old & Grey

master brummie
Stitcher a lot of your picture posts I have been unable to see due to the hack but the ones I can see I really enjoy. I remember Brum partly from the Fifties when my parents brought me up from Dorset to see my Step-sister, we arrived at Snow Hill Station and I loved the whole thing the sounds, the steam and the people rushing around.

My recollections of Broad Street when I walked down it from Five Ways to the BBC are still fairly clear, even to looking in the magic shop window and then going in and buying a thing you put in your mouth that let you throw your voice. Suffice to say it didn't work all I got were squeaks an funny burbling sounds. I even remember the day the whole area was over taken by a massive swarm of flying ants.

I went into a shop in St Martins Street and bought a penny orange ice lolly, the taste was something new, I'd never had a lolly that tasted so much of orange, the taste seemed to explode in my mouth.

These days the shops wouldn't be able to make them due to public health. And a small boy wandering down Broad Street on his own would have the Police and Social Services racing to the scene

I used to walk over to the offices of a shipping company close to the corner of Calthorpe Road and Islington Row and stare the model ship in the window.

Then came the Sixties when I moved to Brum, no train, this time I traveled using my thumb and got dropped at Stonebridge roundabout from where I walked to Maypole.

I found a bedsit in Showell Green Lane and got a job at Laughton & Sons, remember Twinco picnic wear or Straton compacts ?


 

carolina

master brummie
Old and Grey I was given a Stratton compact for my 16th birthday from my boss in my first job. I probably didnt appreciate it in the 60s.
 
S

Stitcher

Guest
Old And Grey, I was born in 1940 and I know one born more than five years later will have the treasure trove of memories that I have. This is only my opinion but I truly believe that the best has gone and I enjoyed it all.
 

Jayell

master brummie
I also had a Stratton compact. I think it was given to me for my 18th Birthday by my auntie and uncle. It was gold coloured and had a lipstick holder on the side. It was in a black cover and I loved it.

Judy
 

Old & Grey

master brummie
I remember one of the thing that they made used the inside of clam shells which was cut into the shapes for the back of hair brushes, combs and mirrors. They called it Mother of Pearl and once it was finished with there was a load of it in the waste bins.

I worked in the coloring department where we mixed up the various shades of colours for the plastic plates, knifes and forks.
 

Old & Grey

master brummie
Old And Grey, I was born in 1940 and I know one born more than five years later will have the treasure trove of memories that I have. This is only my opinion but I truly believe that the best has gone and I enjoyed it all.

I have a feeling you are right. Times have changed and in many cases they are not going to get any better. We have lost so much and had so much forced up on us with no chance to change things.
 

cookie273uk

master brummie
! was born in 1930 and in my personal opinion this country of mine started changingt in about the 60's, for the worse I might add and is still changing now and there is nothing we can do about it. Eric
 

Bernard67Arnold

master brummie
Hi Eric,Without doubt we have seen the most halcyon days in this countrys
history.Most of us did our bit for King and Country, paid our way, taught our
children right from wrong, and got no thanks or reward for it.We can only hope
that at the end of of the day there is a better world in the hereafter, cheers now
Bernard
 
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BernardR

Guest
Sorry to introduce a comment of mine own but this thread is really about the photos of Aston which we are all enjoying seeing either again for for the first time. We have a Banter section for the sort of debate that seems to be developing. I recognise how easy it is to get side tracked so before I fall into the same trap can we get back on course.

Keep up the great work Trevor we all appreciate it.

Ta ever so.



Bernie
 

Michael_Ingram

master brummie
I was born in the 40s and the country was always changing. The fifties were great - rock and roll, teenagers, electronic music, great English artists, Festival of Britain. And then came the 60s - WOW what a great time. Were can I start - fashion, music, art, respect for all genders and ethnic origins. An explosion of colour and understanding. If it wasn't so great why do we see the fashions of that time copied now. My big regret at the moment is that we are not changing enough. I am optimistic for the future though. The 60s taught me to be positive
 
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BernardR

Guest
If this thread deteriorates into a political debate I will close it pending discussion with the others of the Admin team. Please believe me I would not want to do that as I am or was, finding it very interesting.
 

Old & Grey

master brummie
Has anyone got any pictures of the town side of the railway bridge at Aston Station, in the late 60's there was a scrapyard there that was owned by Pat Roach. Funny how his name pops up all over the place on these forums.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Viv
From at least 1890 till the early 1950s the malthouse in Johnston St was owned by Ansells
 
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