• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Ashted Brewery, Heneage Street and Sea Horse Inn, Buck Street

Reevesie

Brummie babby
Thanks for posting the pictures and your research, I also have an interest in Marrian family history. My partner's Grandfather James Lyon Marrian is the Grandson of William Marrian (1797 -1851). Colin is teasing me the ownership of a photograph of William if he could post it would be most appreciated as I could attach to my family tree. It's tricky getting my mind around which William, James or Francis I'm looking at!

William Marrian 1797 - 1851 had a pub - the Sea-horse Inn, Buck Street, Birmingham. He and his wife Ann are buried at Warstone Lane Cemetery in the Jewellery Quarter. Both Marrians are buried in the same grave, there was a gravestone, but this was laid flat by the City Council in the 1950s, and, though it should still be there, it is now covered over, and there is no access to it.

Whilst researching William Marrian and The Sea Horse Inn I found an interesting newspaper article Aris’s Birmingham Gazette 1848 all about the Licensed Vituallers' Asylum and William Marrian’s part in the society and the formal stone laying ceremony.

It would be very interesting to find the trowel manufactured by Collis and Co for the Licensed Victuallers Asylum foundation stone laying ceremony. One would imagine that it would be something that has been kept, I have enquired at the Birmingham Museum but Birmingham Museums Trust has suspended its collections enquiries and appointments service in order to focus on major capital projects including the redevelopment of Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery and the creation of a new offsite museum store.


Helen
 

Attachments

  • William Marrian - Aris's Gazette Sept 4 1848.pdf
    399 KB · Views: 10

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Have you seen the short chapter on the Sea Horse in "The old Taverns of Birmingham" by Eliezer Edwards (1879), which mentions your partner's ancestor?
 

Reevesie

Brummie babby
Have you seen the short chapter on the Sea Horse in "The old Taverns of Birmingham" by Eliezer Edwards (1879), which mentions your partner's ancestor?
I don't have access to "The old Taverns of Birmingham" is it available online?

Thanks Helen
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
No, not to my knowledge. A photocopy of the digitised scan is available for sale. I have scanned the section on my copy as a pdf, but it is too large to add here. If you send me your email address by private message (Click on Inbox at top of page then click on "new conversation") Iwill email it to you
 

Sadbrewer

proper brummie kid
Just to put a bit of extra information in that might be useful.
The name of Marrian crops up further afield, I was doing some research on a Brewery in my hometown of Mexborough called Bolsover & Sons.
I found the founder Henry Bolsover had previously been a partner in the Sheffield firm of Hinde, Marrian & Bolsover.
It's a while since I did the genealogy but if I remember rightly Marrian was a Brum. Bolsover and Hinde left the partnership around 1840...just a few years later Marrian was re-capitalised and went onto become Thomas Marrian based at the Burton Weir Brewery, Sheffield.
The Brewery History Society page suggests it was a moderate size, having 66 pubs at its closure, my research suggests it was much larger, with a lot of pubs being leasehold, I wouldn't be surprised if the number was at least 2 or 3x more.
They were exporters and had agents in Australia and New Zealand.
I'm not certain without making reference but I think Thos. Marrian became the Mayor of Sheffield.132358
 

Reevesie

Brummie babby
Just to put a bit of extra information in that might be useful.
The name of Marrian crops up further afield, I was doing some research on a Brewery in my hometown of Mexborough called Bolsover & Sons.
I found the founder Henry Bolsover had previously been a partner in the Sheffield firm of Hinde, Marrian & Bolsover.
It's a while since I did the genealogy but if I remember rightly Marrian was a Brum. Bolsover and Hinde left the partnership around 1840...just a few years later Marrian was re-capitalised and went onto become Thomas Marrian based at the Burton Weir Brewery, Sheffield.
The Brewery History Society page suggests it was a moderate size, having 66 pubs at its closure, my research suggests it was much larger, with a lot of pubs being leasehold, I wouldn't be surprised if the number was at least 2 or 3x more.
They were exporters and had agents in Australia and New Zealand.
I'm not certain without making reference but I think Thos. Marrian became the Mayor of Sheffield.View attachment 132358


Extracts from the Marrian family tree https://www.marrian.org/

History and Pedigree of the Family of Marrian, formerly Depré, of Shropshire and Staffordshire (1957)

The present-day branch of the family at Birmingham began in the year 1796, when FRANCIS MARRIAN (X. 5.) (whose portrait also exists) became landlord of the "Sea-Horse" Inn at Aston. He made it into a remarkable and very well-known hostelry, combining the functions of inn, club and concert-hall; and a chapter is given to it in "Old Taverns of Birmingham", by Eliezer Edwards (Birmingham 1879). WILLIAM MARRIAN (XI. 9.), his son, succeeded him as landlord in 1840; and the "Sea-Horse" remained in the family's hands for many years afterwards. In addition, two breweries were owned by members of this branch in the early 19th century; MARRIAN & CRACKLOW, Ashted Brewery, Birmingham, in which JOHN MARRIAN (X. 4.), was a partner; and Burton Weir Brewery, Sheffield, which was founded in 1830 by THOMAS MARRIAN (XI. 12.), and eventually passed to his sons.

Mention may be made of certain other members of the Birmingham branch. JOHN MARRIAN (XI. 8.) was partner in a firm of stampers and piercers called MARRIAN & REYNOLDS; his brother, BENJAMIN JAMES PRATT MARRIAN (XI. 13.) was a brassfounder. In later generations, JAMES ROBERT MARRIAN (XII. 13.) became a Birmingham doctor, and WILLIAM LYON MARRIAN (XII Birmingham doctor, and WILLIAM LYON MARRIAN (XIII. 21.) founded the gold-pen manufacturing business of W L MARRIAN (PENS) LTD.


As Marrian is quite unusual name it is easy to find it in the records! I am finding it very interesting William Lyon Marrian founded the nib company.

Pedigree and History Morton Marrain (1952).pdf

As for the “Sea Horse” it passed to Francis’ son William (55) in 1840, to his widow Anne Marrian (55a) in 1851,and passed out of the Family at her death in 1863. We still have one of the original invitation cards to the fifty-third (and last) anniversary (1862) of the Baron of Beef Dinner, that was such a memorable institution of the “Sea Horse”: the guests are bidden to sit down to this mammoth feast at four in the afternoon!To conclude the story of the Tavern: it fell into disrepute in later years, then became a Methodist Mission Hall, and was finally destroyed by enemy action at the beginning of 1941.

The three sons of Francis Marrian referred to by Mr Wards are the younger sons: Francis (56), the silversmith; Thomas (57) the founder of Burton Weir Brewery, Sheffield, and resident of Thurcroft Hall, Rotherham; and Benjamin James Pratt Marrian (58), the brassfounder, who was the patentee of swinging oil lamps for ships. Unfortunately, none of these younger sons have left any descendants to carry on the name today.
 

Sadbrewer

proper brummie kid
Just to make a slight correction to the official history...the author may have assumed Burton Weir was founded in 1830, but that's not correct, the 1830's venture was the Spring St Brewery of Hinde, Marrian & Bolsover...things appear to go wrong about 1838/9 when Hinde leaves the partnership, followed soon after by Henry Bolsover...Marrian keeps it on, but goes bankrupt in 1843 and leaves the business, allegedly to take up one of 'the Sheffield trades'...actually a pub, by 1847/8 he's up and brewing again, trading as The Royds Brewery, Attercliffe Road. He is still showing as Royds Brewery in 1856, but by 1857 is trading as Thos. Marrian, Burton Weir Bry.
Hope this is helpful.
 

Reevesie

Brummie babby
Thanks for clearing this up, I have been trying to work out what happened, found newspaper announcemnets of partnership dissolved 1840 and bankrupcy June 1843. It seems he went on to buy land in Thurcroft.

Thurcroft Colliery The land on which the village would one day stand was bought in the 1800s (along with the Hall) by a Sheffield brewer (Thomas Marrian), whose son, Thomas Marrian Jr, leased the coal mining rights to Rother Vale Collieries
 

Attachments

  • 1840 Partnership dissolved.jpg
    1840 Partnership dissolved.jpg
    113.1 KB · Views: 5
  • 1843 bankrupt.jpg
    1843 bankrupt.jpg
    41.9 KB · Views: 4

Sadbrewer

proper brummie kid
Thanks for clearing this up, I have been trying to work out what happened, found newspaper announcemnets of partnership dissolved 1840 and bankrupcy June 1843. It seems he went on to buy land in Thurcroft.

Thurcroft Colliery The land on which the village would one day stand was bought in the 1800s (along with the Hall) by a Sheffield brewer (Thomas Marrian), whose son, Thomas Marrian Jr, leased the coal mining rights to Rother Vale Collieries

Hi Reevsie....just to correct myself, Bolsover left the partnership first, followed by Hinde.
I think Bolsover and Marrian may have bought into Hinde's business around 1835/6...in 1835 the Spring St Brewery is described as Hinde's XX Brewery.
It doesn't look as though Thomas Marrian's direct line continued beyond his two sons, one appears to be childless, the other has a son who dies at the age of 5...there are though a few daughters to follow if you wish to take it that far.
Going back to the Sea Horse, I found this little gem from 1824(attached)132395
 

Sadbrewer

proper brummie kid
Thanks for clearing this up, I have been trying to work out what happened, found newspaper announcemnets of partnership dissolved 1840 and bankrupcy June 1843. It seems he went on to buy land in Thurcroft.

Thurcroft Colliery The land on which the village would one day stand was bought in the 1800s (along with the Hall) by a Sheffield brewer (Thomas Marrian), whose son, Thomas Marrian Jr, leased the coal mining rights to Rother Vale Collieries
132396
1833...(not 1837 as I tried to scrawl on it!!)...it looks as though he is buying or up rating his brewery equipment.
 

Sadbrewer

proper brummie kid
Thanks for clearing this up, I have been trying to work out what happened, found newspaper announcemnets of partnership dissolved 1840 and bankrupcy June 1843. It seems he went on to buy land in Thurcroft.

Thurcroft Colliery The land on which the village would one day stand was bought in the 1800s (along with the Hall) by a Sheffield brewer (Thomas Marrian), whose son, Thomas Marrian Jr, leased the coal mining rights to Rother Vale Collieries
132397
1837 again
 

Sadbrewer

proper brummie kid
Thanks for clearing this up, I have been trying to work out what happened, found newspaper announcemnets of partnership dissolved 1840 and bankrupcy June 1843. It seems he went on to buy land in Thurcroft.

Thurcroft Colliery The land on which the village would one day stand was bought in the 1800s (along with the Hall) by a Sheffield brewer (Thomas Marrian), whose son, Thomas Marrian Jr, leased the coal mining rights to Rother Vale Collieries
3rd August 1846132399
 

Sadbrewer

proper brummie kid
Thanks for clearing this up, I have been trying to work out what happened, found newspaper announcemnets of partnership dissolved 1840 and bankrupcy June 1843. It seems he went on to buy land in Thurcroft.

Thurcroft Colliery The land on which the village would one day stand was bought in the 1800s (along with the Hall) by a Sheffield brewer (Thomas Marrian), whose son, Thomas Marrian Jr, leased the coal mining rights to Rother Vale Collieries
Death 1851132400132400132401
 

Sadbrewer

proper brummie kid
Extracts from the Marrian family tree https://www.marrian.org/

History and Pedigree of the Family of Marrian, formerly Depré, of Shropshire and Staffordshire (1957)

The present-day branch of the family at Birmingham began in the year 1796, when FRANCIS MARRIAN (X. 5.) (whose portrait also exists) became landlord of the "Sea-Horse" Inn at Aston. He made it into a remarkable and very well-known hostelry, combining the functions of inn, club and concert-hall; and a chapter is given to it in "Old Taverns of Birmingham", by Eliezer Edwards (Birmingham 1879). WILLIAM MARRIAN (XI. 9.), his son, succeeded him as landlord in 1840; and the "Sea-Horse" remained in the family's hands for many years afterwards. In addition, two breweries were owned by members of this branch in the early 19th century; MARRIAN & CRACKLOW, Ashted Brewery, Birmingham, in which JOHN MARRIAN (X. 4.), was a partner; and Burton Weir Brewery, Sheffield, which was founded in 1830 by THOMAS MARRIAN (XI. 12.), and eventually passed to his sons.

Mention may be made of certain other members of the Birmingham branch. JOHN MARRIAN (XI. 8.) was partner in a firm of stampers and piercers called MARRIAN & REYNOLDS; his brother, BENJAMIN JAMES PRATT MARRIAN (XI. 13.) was a brassfounder. In later generations, JAMES ROBERT MARRIAN (XII. 13.) became a Birmingham doctor, and WILLIAM LYON MARRIAN (XII Birmingham doctor, and WILLIAM LYON MARRIAN (XIII. 21.) founded the gold-pen manufacturing business of W L MARRIAN (PENS) LTD.


As Marrian is quite unusual name it is easy to find it in the records! I am finding it very interesting William Lyon Marrian founded the nib company.

Pedigree and History Morton Marrain (1952).pdf

As for the “Sea Horse” it passed to Francis’ son William (55) in 1840, to his widow Anne Marrian (55a) in 1851,and passed out of the Family at her death in 1863. We still have one of the original invitation cards to the fifty-third (and last) anniversary (1862) of the Baron of Beef Dinner, that was such a memorable institution of the “Sea Horse”: the guests are bidden to sit down to this mammoth feast at four in the afternoon!To conclude the story of the Tavern: it fell into disrepute in later years, then became a Methodist Mission Hall, and was finally destroyed by enemy action at the beginning of 1941.

The three sons of Francis Marrian referred to by Mr Wards are the younger sons: Francis (56), the silversmith; Thomas (57) the founder of Burton Weir Brewery, Sheffield, and resident of Thurcroft Hall, Rotherham; and Benjamin James Pratt Marrian (58), the brassfounder, who was the patentee of swinging oil lamps for ships. Unfortunately, none of these younger sons have left any descendants to carry on the name today.
Marrian and Crackl132405ow sale 1854
 

Reevesie

Brummie babby
Thanks for all of the above, brilliant I need to get them in some sort of order!

I have ordered a copy ‘Bygone Breweries of Sheffield’ off Amazon for more information on Thomas Marrian (1805-1883).

I have found this photograph in book about ‘Lost Alleys of Tewkesbury’ The George Inn W. Marrian 1920.

It is next to an alley in the high street Tewkesbury. I am trying to track down which W. Marrian this would be.

132419 William
 

Sadbrewer

proper brummie kid
Hi William good find...Marrian's are very thin on the ground in Tewkesbury but..132423

this seems like the right man, but I can't find him in Tewkesbury before that, the closest I can find is this candidate in a Cheltenham pub.132424
 

Sadbrewer

proper brummie kid
Thanks for all of the above, brilliant I need to get them in some sort of order!

I have ordered a copy ‘Bygone Breweries of Sheffield’ off Amazon for more information on Thomas Marrian (1805-1883).

I have found this photograph in book about ‘Lost Alleys of Tewkesbury’ The George Inn W. Marrian 1920.

It is next to an alley in the high street Tewkesbury. I am trying to track down which W. Marrian this would be.

View attachment 132419 William
Mentioning Bygone Breweries of Sheffield...the author Dave Parry was a friend of mine, unfortunately I can't just lay my hands on my copy but it was one of Dave's early publications, he was pretty accurate in his findings at the time, but we may have a lot more to add now.
Andy
 

Reevesie

Brummie babby
Aha… I've found him in my tree. He was in Gloucestershire Echo 29th May 1903.

I, William Marrain, late of the Crown Hotel, Cheltenham give notice that I will not be responsible for any debt or debts contracted by my wife, Annie Marrian.

Looks like he left Cheltenham in a hurry, Cheltenham Chronical 20th June 1903, although his friends were sad to see him go.

132425132426
 

Reevesie

Brummie babby
Can anyone give me a clue as to where Buck Street was?

National Library of Scotland have all the Ordenance Survey maps but I have no idea where it was as I'm not a Brummie!

Aston some where? Is there something that I can search for that would have been there in 1851 for reference?

Thanks
 
Top