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Arctic Convoys

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Lady P
In wartime, they only carried HMS on their hats, no ship name. My late father in law was a Chief ERA from 1932 to 1945 (and sunk three times, including the Repulse at Singapore) but he apparently did one Artic convoy, he did not speak much of the war and it did have a bad effect on his later life (an inability to settle or take a regular job), but he did speak of the privations of the Artic convoy and said he was glad to get back to warmer climes, Some of the names on your father's record are shore establishments (Stone Frigates) - Collingwood (Fareham), Victory (There were 8 in WWII) renamed HMS Nelson in 1974, Ferret (at Londonderry), King Alfred (Hove) and Drake (Plymouth). I am having difficulty identifying the one name on his records that looks as if it begins with an X

Bob, It's actually a fancy 'L' - the name is Lochailort and more information can be found at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lochailort.

It was originally a country house, taken over first by the army and then the navy. Not sure what he was there for but he was training on torpedos at one stage. The house is in a beautiful setting and as I said in an earlier post, we passed it whilst travelling on the West Highland railway some years ago.

I knew that some of the names were of training establishments but didn't know there were that many.
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Bob, It's actually a fancy 'L' - the name is Lochailort and more information can be found at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lochailort.

It was originally a country house, taken over first by the army and then the navy. Not sure what he was there for but he was training on torpedos at one stage. The house is in a beautiful setting and as I said in an earlier post, we passed it whilst travelling on the West Highland railway some years ago.

I knew that some of the names were of training establishments but didn't know there were that many.
Most matelots dreamt of a stone frigate permanent posting, when I first moved to the South West I was on the Torpoint Ferry going into Plymouth and there was an obese chief looking very wistful, I got talking to another man from HMS Raleigh, who advised that this Chief arrived at Raleigh when it opened and by good fortune had spent his whole career there. His only seagoing was twice daily on the Torpoint Ferry. He had joined 1939 and this was 1962.

BOB
 
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