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Ancient Views

Rupert

master brummie
I thought that it might be interesting to post a view with a map, in this case using the 1890 ordnance survey map to locate the view. If only the link is posted it does not take up much space and those who want a permanent ref can download. Anyway here goes:

https://www.bmagic.org.uk/objects/1965V221.47

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/m...d=10098&ox=2298&oy=2344&zm=1&czm=1&x=286&y=88

https://www.pbase.com/beppuu/image/81046986

https://www.pbase.com/beppuu/image/81046982


On the map looking from the N.W. corner of Edgbaston and Jamaica row junction...southwards across St Martins Lane at the Hotel. Just poking out in the bottom left is the railing surrounding St Martins I think and the buildings on the left are in Moat Lane. Edgbaston Street is immediately to the right and Jamaica Row is straight ahead.
There are two Phyllis Nicklin picture links too.
I thought it might be interesting. If you have only a picture and no map ref. just post the picture with as many details as possible and maybe we can chase it down on the Ordnance Survey map.
 

Rupert

master brummie
OK. here's another shot at location. Some will be difficult and sometimes there will be no certainty but here there are some clues.
A link to a superbe Frank Taylor Lockwood painting of some cottages in Acocks Green made in the thirties :

https://www.bmagic.org.uk/objects/1995V20

The shaddow of the tree from behind gives a clue so I put the cottages on the north side of the road. There are 5 linked cottages in a row with an appendage on the western end and beyond the far end there seems to be a wall with a driveway into a set back building. Below is a link to the 1890 map which I believe to be the location. The artist must have set up shop on the south side side walk possibly in the afternoon from the shaddow. The road is Warwick Road.



https://www.british-history.ac.uk/m...d=10107&ox=1776&oy=2380&zm=1&czm=1&x=174&y=36

The five cottages I think are just below the second C in Acocks green and the wall and driveway beyond are to the vicarage. It's all gone now but some locational names remain. There can be life in these old lines.

Below is a recent skyshot.
 

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Catkin

Guest
Thays a lovely water colour picture Rupert. Thank you ...Cat:)
 

Rupert

master brummie
You know anyone can join in but try and keep the same format and use links only to online pictures and 1890 survey and maybe a GE shot We all use these all of the time so they should be ok. Many of the buildings that were around in the 50s date from before the 1890 survey and they are pretty accurately represented. The posted link to the old pictures has many great scenes and usually a little write up. It takes time though and a little intuition. If anyone needs help on how to post the links let me know, it's pretty simple.
 
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Beryl M

Guest
After spending an enjoyable half an hour looking at pictures I can see you went to a lot of trouble Rupert - I particularly liked the water colours :)Thank you
 

Rupert

master brummie
OK. here is another Frank Taylor Lockwood great picture, Trinity Terrace. The scene is immediately to the north of Holy Trinity Church on Camp Hill. You can see the houses on the right side of the street and the Money Lenders at the end of the road with the shed like addition and passageway. On the left of the picture is the wall surrounding the church with the trees behind it. At the end of the Terrace on the corner of Camp Hill you can see the tree. These features are represented on the 1890 map and although the picture was made in August 1959 the place is remarkably unchanged at that time. At the end of the Terrace is the junction of Camp Hill and Bradford Street.

https://www.bmagic.org.uk/objects/1995V46

So in the map link below, look at the row of trees in the churchyard and count 5 trees starting at the left end and visualize the artist sitting there, on the side walk,on an August day, in the shade of the church wall and trees, with his sketch pad and looking to the west.

If you type 'Trinity Terrace Birmingham UK' into Google E. you can see what is there today and I wonder if one or two of the trees are the same. The one on the corner is gone though.

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/m...d=10102&ox=4189&oy=216&zm=1&czm=1&x=603&y=196

Below Trinity Church from Bradford Street; same era as the painting. You can see the Belisha Beacons and Camp Hill running behind the wall poking in from the left. The trees that you see would be the ones in the painting. This link is Keith Berry's site; the library pastes do not seem to work.

https://www.pbase.com/image/81046989
 
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ornette

Guest
The Phyllis Nicklin page says

"UPDATE: The main slide collection has re-appeared on E-Bank/West Midlands Library Challenge site"

Does anyone have a link?
 
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Catkin

Guest
Hello Ornette,:) thank you for printing her name (Phyllis Nicklin) i hunted high and low for it yesterday... Cat:)
 

missjayniee

master brummie
Thanks for this link its lovely to see the bullring as it used to be, my nan used to take me there when i was a child, brings back some lovely memories.

missjayniee
 

Rupert

master brummie
I notice that the site ref. pictures keep dissappearing. Is there something wrong in posting links to the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery? The pictures are still there on the site but are being moved around so that the link fails. Do they frown on this practice.
 
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Rupert

master brummie
I am at a loose end and it is twenty past twelve. Should be in bed but here is another Frank Taylor Lockwood painting from the BM&AG that is irresistible and easy to find on GE and the 1890 map. The Dolphin Inn at Acocks Green. If you look at the SW corner of Dolphin Lane and Warwick Road you will have found the spot. In the picture, the line of trees in the deep background (zoom in) would have been along Victoria Road. The view does not seem to have changed much from 1890 to the picture date 1929 and then it was gone. Some of the foreground trees in the picture may even have been on the 1890 map. You can see the Inn set back from the Warwick road on the map just as in the picture and the dirt frontage for parking horse drawn coaches no doubt.

https://www.bmagic.org.uk/objects/1995V13

Below a link to the 1890 map.
https://www.british-history.ac.uk/m...d=10107&ox=3051&oy=2895&zm=1&czm=1&x=377&y=84

It's very different today but the name remains. See GE Dolphin Lane.
 
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