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A recruitment parade in Corporation St

Old Boy

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

Hi Topsy,

An excellent photograph. Those poor chaps had no idea what they were letting themselves in for. My own father joined in 1914 and could well be in this photo. I wonder how many of them returned after the war. Fortunately my father did or I would not be here.

Old Boy
 
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

I Thought the same when i looked at the photo . Many of our relatives could have been amongst the crowd.
 

brenda barr

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

I'm sure my g/father and 2 uncles could have been there to, luckily my g/father came home but my uncles did'nt...Brenda
 

alanfisher202

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

Did you know there was a recrutement office in New Street during the first world war,I have a picture of the staff,not sure what year though
 

Rupert

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

Well from a sample of one so far, it seems two thirds did not return. Of those that did come back, many would have been wounded and all would have been badly affected by the experience. I know my grandfather was.
 

brenda barr

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

Rupert, my g/father was gassed and suffered the rest of his life having his first heart attack at aged 40 then had a another one 2 years later, so was'nt able to work after that...no pension in those days...also had an uncle who was wounded so bad that even though he was discharged, he did'nt last very long and died at a very young age....Brenda
 

Rupert

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

My grandfather was also gassed and had a very poor outlook on life from then on. Also it occurs to me that there were few jobs available for returning soldiers. I seem to have read that somewhere.
Rupert.
 
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subotone

'OLDBILL'
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

Topsyturvey
Great picture. How proud these Kitchener's men look. Possibly a Birmingham Pals Battalion.

Tony
 

barrie

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

Well from a sample of one so far, it seems two thirds did not return. Of those that did come back, many would have been wounded and all would have been badly affected by the experience. I know my grandfather was.
As was my Grandfather. When he went off to war he was a silversmith, after the war, all he ever had were labouring jobs, his hands were no longer steady enough for silver work.

Barrie.
 

GER22VAN

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

My Great Uncle 11071 Pte Joseph Goldsbury South Staffordshire Regiment lies in Flanders Fields died October 26 th 1917. No Known Grave.
 

terry carter

Birmingham Pals
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

The picture is that of the original volunteers of the 2nd Birmingham Battalion. They had their very first parade at Thorp Street Barracks where they were given their Birmingham Battalion buttonhole badge. Afterwards the battalion marched through Birmingham to St Martins for a Church Parade. This would have been a Sunday in September, 1914. The exact date escapes me for the moment.

The buttonhole badges were given to show that the men had enlisted and so not to be given a white feather by young ladies which was quite common during the opening weeks of WW1.

Terry
 

Rupert

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

Maybe the thread starter or a moderator could revise the spelling of Corporation Street. It might not show up on a search. Yeah; the white feather would be recieved with a bit of a laugh these days. Might not arrive in time.
 
W

Wendy

Guest
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

I have corrected the title as you say Rupert a lot can be missed on Goggle by misspelling. Also this is why we like people to use the search before starting a new thread.
 
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Rupert

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corporation St

Must have been a cold September that year. There seems to have been a dusting of snow.
 

Shortie

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corperation St

My grandfather was shot in the arm, the bullet went in one side and came out the other. He was not treated for three weeks, so the story goes, and the family blamed the lack of treatment for the way his hand was screwed up after that, preventing him from doing any more than a light job. The real reason his hand folded inwards was indeed the result of trauma, however, it looks to me like he probably had Dupuytrens disease. It is hereditory, and I also have Dupuytrens, but so far only the lumps in my hand and no contracture. He was shot and it was discovered, I just had a tiny operation to find out I had got it. I do not understand why he did not have an operation for his contracture, after all, surgery for this problem was available from 1831 onwards, but perhaps there were so many war casualties that there was simply no chance of corrective surgery. My grandfather was very bitter as a result of his injuries. He had a well paid job as a printer which he gave up just six months after getting married to join the war effort, and ended up having very little indeed. Hard not to be bitter in those circumstances I guess.
 

Shortie

master brummie
Re: A recrutement parade in Corporation St

I agree Paul, it takes a special kind of person to put your life on the line. Sad to say I am not one of them (too old now anyway), but I take my hat off to anyone who is courageous enough to join up.
 

ColinB

gone but not forgotten
All irrelevant posts have been removed for discussion by moderators. Please keep on topic.

Colin
 

Rupert

master brummie
Frankly, I have not seen any posts that are irrelevant on this thread. One sentiment was taken inncorrectly by some...but, in the aftermath of two world wars, it was a sentiment that was held by many to be valid. It did not reflect and does not, on the bravery of the men that faught...volunteers and conscripts and regulars. I think that in this day and age, what was happening in that picture would never occur and armies are made up of regular proffesional soldiers who are highly trained. Any war serious enough to require more than this would be over before a parade could be organised. No doubt there were Corporation Street type parades being held for the enemy also and most of them also would have never been close to a gun in their lives before. The sentiment in question merely pointed out that a very large proportion in parades on both sides...would never be seen again.
 

Frothblower

Lubrication In Moderation
Frankly, I have not seen any posts that are irrelevant on this thread. One sentiment was taken inncorrectly by some...but, in the aftermath of two world wars, it was a sentiment that was held by many to be valid. It did not reflect and does not, on the bravery of the men that faught...volunteers and conscripts and regulars. I think that in this day and age, what was happening in that picture would never occur and armies are made up of regular proffesional soldiers who are highly trained. Any war serious enough to require more than this would be over before a parade could be organised. No doubt there were Corporation Street type parades being held for the enemy also and most of them also would have never been close to a gun in their lives before. The sentiment in question merely pointed out that a very large proportion in parades on both sides...would never be seen again.
I second that Rupert
 
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