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  1. Johnfromstaffs

    old car snaps

    No problem. The history of the British car industry overarching the war is interesting. People had more cash than ever before after earnings from industry, (except those who were called up) and a market existed. The trouble was the cars didn’t, and like the Standard Eight, prewar designs were...
  2. Johnfromstaffs

    old car snaps

    Flying Eight, 1939/40. Three speed box, louvres in bonnet. Eight, 1945-48. Four speed box, no bonnet louvres, otherwise very similar. ”Flying” was a marketing thing introduced prewar for those cars built by Standard Motor Co. between 1936 and 1940. It was dropped postwar, as were many of the...
  3. Johnfromstaffs

    Dennis Scribbans

    Thanks for this, FletchLA, I was told about Denis by Gibbs Pancheri, no longer with us, who came to chat at a Bentley Drivers Club meeting back in the 1980s, when I had just joined and turned up at the old office at Long Crendon in Sussex, for a drivers day. The Griffiths and Lamb connection...
  4. Johnfromstaffs

    Smethwick

    Good stuff, mate. I was born in St. Chad’s, and my two brothers, all on the same day! Only me left now.
  5. Johnfromstaffs

    Gone out of fashion

    By British Bulldog do you mean ”possibly offshore maybe European bovine/canine sentient being of indeterminate gender”?
  6. Johnfromstaffs

    Gone out of fashion

    Worse still if you had to follow your dad in the tin bath after he’d been down the pit for a week!
  7. Johnfromstaffs

    Gone out of fashion

    https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/British_Heat_Resisting_Glass_Co
  8. Johnfromstaffs

    Gone out of fashion

    Our Pyrex dishes are still in regular use for cooking microwave items that need a lid, and for storage of items in the fridge. I don’t see that they are out of fashion at all.
  9. Johnfromstaffs

    Gone out of fashion

    Not only the tin bath, but the National Dried Milk tin. There would be one somewhere in most sheds, usually containing an assortment of old screws and rusty nails, if my dad’s shed was typical.
  10. Johnfromstaffs

    Gone out of fashion

    The Pop. Nothing in fashion here!
  11. Johnfromstaffs

    Gone out of fashion

    I rebuilt a Ford 10hp sidevalve engine for my Ford Popular which had suffered a failure on my way home from work. The scrapyard engine was in fair order, but we fitted new pistons and conrods which were supplied with cast in white metal big end bearings. Dad’s pal, a professional mechanic had...
  12. Johnfromstaffs

    Gone out of fashion

    Wheatstone Bridge, one of the few things I understood in A-level Physics!
  13. Johnfromstaffs

    Gone out of fashion

    The old joke that goes “I was walking through a cow pasture when my cap blew off, I tried 3 on before I found it.” Seems appropriate looking at the picture above. I see the foreman on the lower left with his bowler, and the gaffer with his trilby, pipe and moustache. Otherwise caps, caps and...
  14. Johnfromstaffs

    Gone out of fashion

    The biggest problem would be tying a Windsor for someone else, either your mate had very good spatial awareness or he stood behind you and reached over your shoulders to do it. While being able to tie a Windsor with no trouble I now have to resort to ready made dickie bows! I always think this...
  15. Johnfromstaffs

    Gone out of fashion

    Thinking about the subject of this piece, and getting ready for the day, I opened my wardrobe and looked at my collection of ties….and, fyi, I always used a Windsor knot. It is also most impressive that there has been all this conversation about slide rules, and nobody has used the term...
  16. Johnfromstaffs

    Lost Birmingham Canals

    Excellently drawn. This sort of work makes me very green with envy. As my old dad used to say, “you’d have trouble drawing breath.” But he was a “dratter”.
  17. Johnfromstaffs

    Birmingham Water Company.

    Thank you. While I understand the feasibility of a swaged water tube, where the steam pressure would tend to expand the swaged joints to effect a tightening of the seal, a swaged locomotive type boiler tube would seem to suggest the opposite unless the high temperature of the gases passing...
  18. Johnfromstaffs

    Birmingham Water Company.

    Thanks for this. So it seems that I was thinking back to front, and the gain came from water tube boilers permitting higher advantage to be taken from the energy in the combustion. It would be interesting to know more of the techniques of building such a design in 1870, did they have any form of...
  19. Johnfromstaffs

    Birmingham Water Company.

    It’s interesting to see the size of the boilers classified by horsepower, presumably there was some sort of expectation of a standard of performance for the turbines of the day. Really, another world presents itself, 150 years is a long time!
  20. Johnfromstaffs

    Birmingham Water Company.

    Would the late Fred Dibnah have approved? It all looks a bit of a contraption to me, but certainly seems to support the “workshop of the world” image that Birmingham earned during this period. I do wonder, though, if a Lancashire boiler could have done the job more efficiently.
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